BookSmart

B&W printing tips...

I’ve used myphotobook.co.uk in the past to print wedding albums, but have been unhappy with the washy grayscale image reproduction,especially next to rich, deep colour images. 

I like the style of the blub books (contemporary layout / dust jacket etc) and ambout to embark on a wedding album with B&W / colour images shot on a 5D (set to adobe RGB colourspace).  

Does anyone have any tips to help ensure B&W images print nicely? (e.g. Duotone / darkening  / AdobeRGB > SRGB conversion etc)

Cheers 

 

ps. does anyone know how much blurb charge for international shipping to England?

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
barnsyard
Aug 3, 2007 8:35am PDT
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barnsyard
 

I switch my greyscale to duotone (adding a little warm or cool tone), then switch that to sRGB.

Until Blurb sorts out some technical issues, you may get inconsistent results on the black and white, twofold:

1. The inks are metameric.   It isn’t so evident in color printing, but it can be quite pronounced when viewing "black and white" books under different light sources.

2.  Also more evident in the monotone images are any variations in color from printing to printing.  My recent black and white books look very heavy on the magenta, whereas the same book printed more green before.  I suspect this is an issue with infrequent calibration on the printing side.

Posted by
Kiddawg
Aug 3, 2007 9:01am PDT
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Kiddawg
 

Here is how blurb BW printing looked last week:

 

Top book is printed by blurb. Bottom one is an old Helmut Newton’s bought from the local bookstore. You could notice a lot of magenta in what supposed to be light gray areas.

Posted by
earlyadopter
Aug 3, 2007 10:50am PDT
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earlyadopter
 

Nice to see some photos of the colour casting on a finished book.  It does indeed have a slight magenta hue, but as folk say – who knows if the ‘customer’ would notice on a finished album?  Thanks for clarifying the metameric process.

I wonder if adding a deliberate sepia tone (eg. via duotoning and converting to sRGB) would result in a less obviously casted alternative to more apparent b&w problems.  That way a more or less sepia image won’t look like a printing error (Though it’s not ideal either way).  Has anyone tried sepia toned images?

Barnaby 

Posted by
barnsyard
Aug 3, 2007 11:27am PDT
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barnsyard
 

 

I add a light pantone to try to match the kind of warmer toned black and white books that I like.   But again, I believe Blurb has a calibration problem.  Until it is cured, you may get unexpected results (eg, magenta) no matter what color cast you add to your file.   This is only for black and white though.   The color repros have looked great.

Posted by
Kiddawg
Aug 3, 2007 1:21pm PDT
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Kiddawg
 

I also was thinking of doing a sepia. My friend’s wedding book had just one grayscale photo that I had given her as Adobe RGB and it looked very neutral. I’m thinking that a magenta / greenish cast across a range of sepia images would not be nearly as noticeable as variations across a collection of neutral grays, although I’d rather not make the sepia too saturated or severe.

Posted by
pasoccupe
Aug 23, 2007 2:24pm PDT
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pasoccupe