BookSmart

Turning off "autosave"

Autosave sounds like a great feature.  And it would be, were the bookmaker software capable of running smoothly.

 

Unfortunately, it appears that booksmart is not capable of handling books above 120 or so pages.  Even after getting the new 1.9 version (on the previous version my book just kept crashing when I attempted to view past the 100th page) I still am getting the same crash issues.

 I would like to go back and trim the fat, but the book "autosaved" my 120+ pages, and now I can’t even delete earlier pages in order to make the book a size that the program can handle.  The Autosave clearly strains the capabilities of booksmart,  and that it allows the program to get into deep water from which it cannot return. 

 

I think blurb needs, like mypublisher, to admit the limitations of its technology, and set limits of 100 pages for books.  If I had known that this limitation existed, I would have designed my book in a far different way, and be enjoying an actual bound copy of my book, instead of contemplating waiting another 6 months for another booksmart fix that will allow me to add 5 more pages, and then get into the same trouble.

 

Very dissapointing.   

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
justiceiro
Oct 19, 2007 4:21pm PDT
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justiceiro
 

I’ve seen, in person, several books of over 200 pages produced by Booksmart.  Obviously the program can handle larger books, just look through the bookstore.  I suspect the problems you and others are having have to do with specific machine configuration.  Still frustrating, still not right, but Booksmart is still a "work in progress".  Perhaps try a friends machine and see if you have the same problems.  You could even try exporting your file to a portable or flash drive and see if the same file acts the same on a different machine.

Posted by
yonosey
Oct 19, 2007 5:36pm PDT
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yonosey
 

Hi,

That is a good idea that yonosey suggested about trying it on another computer. My book is 270+ pages, lots of photos and text (memoir of a 90+ yr old). The book is beautiful, and Booksmart didn’t slow down the computer at all while I was working on it.  Aside from a few version 1.8 glitches, the process went really well with few technical problems.

One thing I notice that can make a difference in how the computer handles resource-intensive applications is to run anti-spyware, anti-virus, and anti-adware programs, and defragment the hard drive regularly. I’m not technically oriented, but I find that keeping up with the maintenance helps a lot in keeping everything running well.

Best of luck on your book, it is worth all the time and effort in the end :)

Posted by
karri
Oct 19, 2007 7:02pm PDT
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karri
 

I don ‘t think the machine setup is the issue.  I’m running it in a Mac wit 2 gigs of SDRAM that run at 2.16 GHz  (the intel core 2 duo setup).  I think the issue is that the program imbeds (I am guessing here) the photos rather than indexing them, and it simpy can’t handle the the load.  I am running an average of 3 photos per page, all from an 8MP camera, converted from RAW, so by the time I reach page 120 that’s a lot of data.  And when I want to delete an earlier page, (say page 3), the the program has to try to re-arrange 200+ images.  It can’t do it.

Blaming this on the machine is ridicuous.  The Mac is specifically designed to efficiently run graphics intensive software, much more efficiently than a PC.  If a 6 month old iMac can’t do it, I fail to see how a PC can.  Nevertheless, I’ll run it on my PC and see what happens.  I imagine it will be EXACTLY like what happened the last time the system got hung (with version 1.8) when it crashed the same way it does now on both computers.

 Don’t the blurb programmers stress test this stuff?  Why are they releasing half-baked material?

Posted by
justiceiro
Oct 20, 2007 6:00am PDT
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justiceiro
 

I just finished a 320 page book tin 1.9 that I had started in 1.8. I was one of the users that experienced numerous crahes with 1.8. I am happy to say that 1.9 worked almost flawlessly, so I do think great improvements have been made.

Posted by
wtmarks
Oct 20, 2007 10:38am PDT
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wtmarks
 

I would like to turn off autosave not because it is slowing me down but because it does not help me when an error occurs. For example, earlier today I hit a delete button that wiped out the next 3 pages. (Some kind of glitch that I don’t understand.) I should have been able to go back and find what had been “autosaved”, but I couldn’t. Without the autosave feature I would save frequently, when I was confident that things were as I wanted them, saving each time under a consecutively numbered name. This would allow me to go back and find what I want from earlier.

Posted by
kfkolonel
Oct 22, 2007 8:02pm PDT
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kfkolonel
 

Here’s a workaround:

Use "Save A Copy". When you hit a point when you’re satisfied with the way your book is going, save a copy. Before you experiment on a new layout, or try out a new theme, save the good copy first as a backup. I save mine in stages—Chapter 1, Halfway Through, Three-Fourths, Almost Done etc. so if I don’t like the way a new layout looks, I can just trash that and open a previously saved version.

Posted by
adrilon
Oct 22, 2007 8:42pm PDT
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adrilon
 

Save a copy is a good work-around, but if your book is corrupted on opening, the save a copy will corrupt both the original and the new copy. I generally do a manual backup before every session. Go to "my documents" "BookSmartData" create a new folder called "backup" (or whatever), now find your project, copy the entire catalog to the "backup" catalog". If you need to restore just copy the catalog from "backup" to the original location.

Posted by
Kingfisher
Oct 22, 2007 9:20pm PDT
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Kingfisher