Tips and Tricks

Bit depth

What if your computer does not provide the option of 32 bits, which is the bit depth required to launch the program?  Is there another way around this?

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
normanka
Jun 25, 2008 8:01pm PDT
Permalink
normanka
 

All computers of the past 7 or 8 years are 32-bit capable. The only way you could have a computer that is not is if you have a truly ancient one still operating DOS, Windows 3.1, or Windows 95/98. What kind of computer do you have and how old is it? You seriously need a computer upgrade if you are trying to work with one that old. Even a "first generation" WinXP computer would be hobbled by the Blurb software which is clunky and slow.

Posted by
nemophoto
Jul 4, 2008 3:30pm PDT
Permalink
nemophoto
 

The computers are 32 bit capable, but that isn’t the issue here. The issue is the number of bits that can be used by the display card to define colours for the display. Many of those just a few years old can only display 24-bit colour.

It just might be that your display settings are set to 24 bit for speed reasons. On a Windows m/c (sorry I can’t help if you kave a Mac) right click on background of the display and choose Properties, then choose Settings then go to the Colour Quality drop down. Click on that and double check that a 32-bit option isn’t there for you.

If there isn’t you will need to buy and install a new Display Adaptor/Graphic Card, no need to buy anew computer. You don’t need a fancy one for using BookSmart, the expensive ones that some salespeople in many stores will try and sell you one are for high-end gaming – don’t believe them!. If you just do office type applications, surf the internet, photo editing, etc a cheap one will do. In the UK you can get a perfectly adequate one for less than £30, so probably $40 in the U.S. A small computer repair shop would supply one and fit it for a reasonable price, it’s about 20 minutes work.

.......Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Jul 5, 2008 12:45am PDT
Permalink
tfrankland
 

24 bits are just like 32 bits.. they both use eight bits per R/G/B color channel so you will get the exactly same results. The 32 bits are just more processor-friendly as they are easier to address in the graphics card memory – so 32 bits are actually faster! On the other side 24 bits require less memory. The remaining 8 bits of the 32 bits mode are used for other purposes which depend on the gfx card but generally don’t improve the display of still pictures.

In short: 24 bits == 32 bits regarding quality

Some older gfx cards don’t have enough *memory* to display 24 bits at high resolutions. They only allow 15/16 bit modes which really is not enough for photo editing. In this case choose a smaller resolution or get a (even cheap) new  graphics card.

 

Posted by
jampy81
Aug 9, 2008 5:49am PDT
Permalink
jampy81
 

jampy81 that is not the issue, see my response to your similar post…..

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/1/topics/3498?page=1#posts-15990

.........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Aug 9, 2008 2:14pm PDT
Permalink
tfrankland
 

Bonjour jampy81,

Tony is right all along. As for 24 bits vs 32 bits, it is totally different ball of game. Perhaps you want to do some research on your own, because Tony has offered links as mentioned.

Good luck.

Have some fun bookmaking, Brian, a passionate Blurbarian

Posted by
brianbonitz
Aug 9, 2008 2:59pm PDT
Permalink
brianbonitz