General Interest

UK print quality

Is the print quality different for UK customers, i’ve heard in other forums that Blurb uses printers in the Netherlands which produce worse results than the US printers.

 Can anyone second this, or tell me the quality is good (in the UK) – fingers crossed…

Also, does anyone know the exact g/m2 (grams per metres squared) density of the paper used?

 Thanks

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
jameslupton
Sep 26, 2007 12:31pm PDT
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jameslupton
 

Hi James, our European print partner uses exactly the same printing presses as our folks in the US.  The paper is slightly different because the exact match is not available on the Continent.  Is is the same weight (80#, 118 gsm) as our US printers.

Best,

—bw 

Posted by
bruce
Sep 26, 2007 1:10pm PDT
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bruce Icon_staff
 

wow, fast response!

thanks bruce. 118gsm is a little on the thin side – is it glossy?

glad to hear printers are the same, and i think 118gsm is reasonable with respects to the low costs :) 

Posted by
jameslupton
Sep 26, 2007 1:43pm PDT
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jameslupton
 

Hi James

I had a large format book printed a couple of weeks ago and the quality is good. I wrote a bit on the forum about the production and the out come, you can see it here. The paper is matt which is the same as most other publishers at this price point.

Louis

Posted by
PhotoLouis
Sep 26, 2007 2:02pm PDT
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PhotoLouis
 

James, our paper is semi-matte.

Cheers!

 —bw

Posted by
bruce
Sep 26, 2007 3:02pm PDT
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bruce Icon_staff
 

sorry, last thing. i know its off the topic, but it applies to UK customers – has anyone had to pay import duties before?

Thanks again for replies 

Posted by
jameslupton
Sep 26, 2007 3:08pm PDT
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jameslupton
 

I guess the answer for the whole EU is no! No import duty is applied for goods produced and sold within EU member states.

You must of course add VAT to the price. The sum presented to you by Blurb (book cost+VAT+UPS) is the final cost.

Posted by
larios
Sep 26, 2007 3:49pm PDT
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larios
 

Even if you had obtained the book from the US printers, no duty would be payable.

See http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/downloadFile?contentID=HMCE_PROD_009989 for details .

 

regards,

David

Posted by
dcragg
Sep 26, 2007 3:55pm PDT
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dcragg
 

Thanks for the replies.

Much appreciate that link David, i have been looking for that info for a while!

Larios, I’m pretty sure there is no VAT for UK customers. it does not show VAT costs on my checkout page, and Blurb and other sources say photo books are zero rated VAT for UK customers. :)

Also, i have just remembered/realised that the books are being printed in Holland, not USA!! So of course there is no import duty…

 Thanks again, James

 P.S, i just clicked ORDER. wish me luck. i’ll keep you posted of how my book turns out.

Posted by
jameslupton
Sep 26, 2007 6:09pm PDT
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jameslupton
 

I have followed several threads about the printing process in the Netherlands and note that there is a common theme of poor print originating from there. I have printed two books, one originated in the US and was great and the other from the Netherlands and it was very dull. I’m open to correction from a Blurb staff member who could give me feedback on this book but every time I reply to their email it bounces back saying that I didn’t type my reply between two stated lines….which I did. and to be honest I’m just very tired of this.

Posted by
pmunden
Sep 27, 2007 9:55am PDT
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pmunden
 

Hi All

I am not satisfied about the Blurb print quality.
Paper is too much thin…
Yes, reading the forum… it seems European users are not satisfied about the print quality 
while Americans are happy ..

Who knows why …

 

 

 

Posted by
massimoconti
Sep 28, 2007 3:26am PDT
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massimoconti
 

Bruce

Can I suggest the Crane & co  MUSEUM brand as your paper supplier ?

Posted by
massimoconti
Sep 28, 2007 3:28am PDT
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massimoconti
 

Thanks for the suggestion as we are always looking for new products to consider.  Unfortunately, the Crane & Co. paper is not certified for use on Indigo presses at this point.  I’ll do a bit more research and see if it will be a viable option in the future.

Best,

—bw 

Posted by
bruce
Sep 28, 2007 8:52am PDT
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bruce Icon_staff
 

I have just received my second blurb project (I am in the UK) Printing is very good quality on a semi-gloss paper, colour balance is accurate, the book jacket is excellent quality, the paper is easily good enough for commercial work.

Fine art volumes would possibly benefit from heavier weight paper but that lis much better served by the very expensive photogravure printing process, which is used for very large runs of work (>50,000)

The Indigo printers are really great for short run work and that type of printer is really responsible for the move towards economical computer to plate (CTP) and is evidenced by the fact that you can now print a single book economically. Previously, no printer would set up a press for a single book… unless we are talking about William Caxton. ;)

Speaking as a professional photographer, I can tell you that I am very particular about the sort of work I hand to my clients. Thus far, 2 blurb projects have been delivered to my absolute satisfaction and I have two very delighted clients. Even if I had worn rose-tinted spectacles, my corporate clients are not so easily fooled and the latest, project for a very large company, had easily passed their close and careful scrutiny.

Incidentally, there is no VAT on books in the UK and so the price you see when you order the book is the price you will pay in total. HTH

jayemcee

Posted by
jayemcee
Sep 28, 2007 10:31am PDT
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jayemcee
 

885285

Posted by
robogilvie
Oct 8, 2013 4:43am PDT
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robogilvie
 

Don’t whatever you do depend on the delivery being guaranteed, especially with large orders. I ordered 100 large square imagewrap books. I’m on the delivery date and they haven’t been dispatched yet and show ‘in production.’ It was crucial to my client that they arrived in time but there’s no warning and worse no customer support that isn’t Pacific time so what customer support there is, can’t find out anything for 24 hrs. Because of this Customer service can never prevent a disaster only try and repair it after it’s happened.Worse still there is no one to ask or communicate with. I was successfully selling Blurb to my clients but it’s all too risky.

Posted by
robogilvie
Oct 8, 2013 4:44am PDT
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robogilvie
 

Print quality seems fine in the Netherlands but delivery is hit and miss. I ordered 100 large square imagewrap books for £5000 and they’ve failed to be delivered on the delivery date showing ’ in production.’ It was crucial to my client that the order was delivered on time which I paid extra for. Customer service is all Pacific time so they know nothing. Worse still they can’t find out for 24 hrs. Why is there no European customer service? What is the point of customer service that starts at 1700 GMT when the print facility is in Netherlands.And why, if an order is not going to be fulfilled is there no warning?

Posted by
robogilvie
Oct 8, 2013 4:52am PDT
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robogilvie