General Interest

To those who are seriously selling their books...

Hi! I’m a newbie in this so-called book industry and I’m thankful to blurb for encouraging people to self-publish their books. Anyway, a few people suggested that I should register my current book to our National Library here in the Philippines. Have you guys done or even planned to do this with your self-published books? And what can you say about copyright registration?

Hoping to hear from you guys!
My book’s link: http://www.blurb.com/books/1543472

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
jmdelarama
Oct 5, 2010 9:14pm PDT
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jmdelarama
 

Good evening,

as soon as you  start to sell your books to the public you enter the field of copyright. I fear that at least a good deal of your photographs of monuments in France are in conflict with copyright.

Please check this information on WIKI concerning the panorama Freiheit in France and other European countries.

Quotation:"Some countries, such as France or Belgium, do not have this global permission for making images at public places at all and allow images of copyrighted works only under "incidental inclusion" clauses.<sup class="reference">[11]</sup>"

These facts are a regrettable reality. Your book is very nice with fine photography, but I would not dare to go public with it to be honest.

Under the given circumstances I can not recommend to proceed with the process of a registration.

Posted by
editionh
Oct 7, 2010 10:30am PDT
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editionh
 

What the…I did not know this. That pretty muchs ends any attempt of having an upbeat morning for me.

Posted by
dmkilbride
Oct 10, 2010 8:23am PDT
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dmkilbride
 

Good day to you gentlemen! That’s just sad! But thanks for the good info regarding some copyright issues in Europe. This only makes me want to further study the matter… I wonder the “how’s” on some registered coffee-table books with such photography content. How did they made their books public then?… Hmmm… the process…

Anyway, thank you again. :)

Posted by
jmdelarama
Oct 11, 2010 12:02am PDT
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jmdelarama
 

But don’t give up! And does anybody here know how one would go about getting oneself an ISBN number so they could sell their books on the open market?

Posted by
TokalaLupe
Oct 12, 2010 9:23am PDT
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TokalaLupe
 

Where you go for an ISBN depends on which country you live in. There is nothing in your profile, nor in your book that I could see, so let us know where you live and I’m sure someone will come up with the relevent ISBN authority.

Or try searching the web for your country name and ISBN.

…..Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Oct 12, 2010 11:45am PDT
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tfrankland
 

Here is the web address for the International ISBN Agency. On this site you will find a link to the National Agency you’re in need of for more information….

www.ISBN-International.org

Posted by
EvangelistET
Oct 12, 2010 7:48pm PDT
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EvangelistET
 

Thank you guys! So it’s really highly recommended to have your book’s ISBN number then right?

Posted by
jmdelarama
Oct 13, 2010 8:25am PDT
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jmdelarama
 

Not necessarily!

If I take the UK (where I live) as an example you cannot buy an individual ISBN, you have to buy them in batches of 10 through Nielsen’s, the UK agency. That costs £111 for 10 or roughly $175.

If you are hoping to sell your book through book shops or the likes of Amazon you will have no choice but to have an ISBN, so you will need to factor in the cost of the ISBN into your cash-flow/profit-loss calculations.

The next cost, if you do go down this route, depends on the country laws on  depositing books with the government. In the UK this involves "donating" a copy to the British Library and to the Bodleian Library at Oxford University.In the US I gather the Library of Congress has a similar role.

 So for me, a £40 book already has overheads of £111 +£40 for the British Library + £40 for the Bodleian Library =  £191 (roughly $300). That overhead needs to be spread across the number of books you think you can sell.

If you are just selling through the Blurb Store (at least in the UK) it will be considered personal (or vanity) publishing and none of this is needed.

I did all the research, found free software to create the bar-code, worked out how to get that in the right place on the back cover and THEN looked at the costs (stupid or what?). Needless to say, as I did not expect to sell dozens of copies, I abandoned the whole idea.

But others have not. Based on the number of books they expect to sell, and the outlets they intend to use, they have done this and to all accounts from the posts in the forums, been sucessful.

So it is down to you. My advice is DO THE SUMS!!!

…..Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Oct 13, 2010 12:10pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

Hi Tony! Thank you so much for your thorough explanation on ISBN. Everything is clear now. :) Big help!

Posted by
jmdelarama
Oct 13, 2010 11:22pm PDT
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jmdelarama
 

Ahah. Well I live in the UK, and do your advice Tony, was very helpful. Though I highly doubt a book as little as mine would sell well enough to regain costs as profits.

But I shall look into it nevertheless.

Posted by
TokalaLupe
Oct 26, 2010 1:25pm PDT
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TokalaLupe
 

Yesterday I heard that you can publish on Amazon and you can get the ISBN for free.

The website is http://www.Createspace.com. I have opened an account and indeed the ISBN seems to be free. I haven`t found out whether they print images toom, but there is a full 4 colouroption for books which makes only sense in connection with picture print.

Posted by
editionh
Nov 7, 2010 2:13am PDT
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editionh
 

I had a look at Createspace , applications to US tax authorities , PDF only , couldn’t create anything as a test without entering bank details . Book previews that certainly didn’t sell the book

 

best of luck

Posted by
Martincreese
Nov 10, 2010 1:52pm PDT
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Martincreese
 

Surely the concern expressed here is a little overblown.  Picture books, travel guides, postcards, etc., published on France must number in the hundreds of thousands, and the vast majority feature scenes of the Eiffel Tower, Place de la Concorde, L’Arc de Triomphe and other notable public spaces or monuments, often on the cover.  The notion that some agency representing any or all of these photographed objects siphons up money from writers and publishers for this activity is nonsensical.  By all means, if you’re concerned, consult a lawyer.  But the chances that someone is going to take you and your lovely little book to court for copyright infringement are virtually zero.

Posted by
mattmark1
Nov 30, 2010 11:43am PDT
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mattmark1