Book Design and Imaging

Some questions relating to Image Processing

Hi

I am thinking of having a book of monochrome images printed using the Proline Pearl Photopaper and wish to know the following :-

I shall be processing my images in Photoshop CS3 to make JPEG copies with the sRGB Profile.  Will the Proline print the full range of tones or will it be necessary to fix my black points above 0 and white points below 255?  If so, at what levels would this paper print white and black?

My images have a keyline around the border – if I ensure that the images are fully displayed on the page in the Booksmart software, will there be any cutoff when printed?

 Is the Proline Pearl Photopaper sufficiently thick to enable printing on both sides of the page without the images showing through?

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
Ega43
Oct 6, 2011 7:18am PDT
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Ega43
 

Somewhere on this site are the color space profiles for Booksmart.  Use them with photoshop to soft proof your images.  I would not adjust the white and black points unless there was saturation in important detail.  DO NOT CONVERT YOUR IMAGES TO THE BOOKSMART PROFILE.

The cutoff is 1/8th inch.  The safe area is 1/4 inch, but my experience has been the 1/8th inch cutoff has been well centered.  Any noticable cutoff of your keyline area will depend upon the width of your keyline.  The wider, the less noticable if the cutoff is not centered.  If it is centered, it won’t be noticable at all.

I’ve not used the Pearl photopaper yet.  The book I’m currently doing will use it.  The books I’ve had printed on standard and premium papers have never had a showthrough problem.

Posted by
Charybdis
Oct 6, 2011 2:54pm PDT
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Charybdis
 

Thanks for the advice.  I think it might be safer to leave out the keylines when I convert my images as I usually set the keyline to only 4 pixels.

Posted by
Ega43
Oct 7, 2011 6:46am PDT
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Ega43
 

Charybdis,

What is the reason for NOT converting images to the booksmart profile" in his case?  Somewhere on the website it says you can do this to avoid pre-press conversion and have more control.  I don’t understand this. Help?

Posted by
nstuart
Oct 7, 2011 4:15pm PDT
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nstuart
 

You’ll have to show me where you got your information. 

For pdf, you can use CMYK or if you prefer to use RGB, use sRGB.

See:
http://blurb.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/451/session/L2F2LzEvdGltZS8xMzE4MTI1OTg3L3NpZC9LcFFGMjVHaw%3D%3D

Booksmart is designed to accept sRGB.  Somewhere in their process they will convert to CMYK because that is what is used for printing.  If you submit a book with a different color space, they will convert it incorrectly, and your colors may be slightly off, or completely messed up.  The Booksmart profile is used with Photoshop to simulate the printer on your screen so you may see what it will look like before it is printed.  It will also show places that are over saturated, that will print with loss of detail and mushed color.  With softproofing, you have the oportunity to adjust these areas before committing them to the book.  Blurbs FAQ on their Booksmart profiles and softproofing are here:
 http://blurb.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/75

Mike

Posted by
Charybdis
Oct 8, 2011 7:22pm PDT
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Charybdis
 

Here’s the page that I am talking about Mike.  I think I’m just getting myself more and more confused.  I thought I understood all of this but maybe not!

http://www.blurb.com/guides/color_management/intro

Posted by
nstuart
Oct 9, 2011 7:00pm PDT
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nstuart
 

I assume you are refering to the statement in the last paragraph.  It does not say to convert to the Blurb profiles.  It implies that if you are submitting in pdf, you can convert to a CMYK profile filtered through the Blurb profile.  Granted, the writer assumed you’d know they  were talking about a pdf submittal.

Booksmart does not accept CMYK.  You can try it.  Convert a photo and load it into a book you are working on.  I bet it looks black on the screen. I’m pretty sure that’s how it would look if you printed it as well.

I’ve never done a book using InDesign or any other pdf editing software, so I’ve never tried to convert to CMYK filtered through a profile.

There is nothing to be confused or worried about, it is very simple.  If you are using BookSmart, only use sRGB.  If you have the appropriate software, softproof using the provided profiles, but do not convert. 

Mike

Posted by
Charybdis
Oct 10, 2011 3:59pm PDT
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Charybdis
 

Thanks for the clarification on the last paragraph,Mike

Last question, in photoshop, go to Edit >Convert to Profile ADVANCED.

  Source Space :  sRGB IEC 61966-2.1  ( is this the correct choice)

 Destination Space:

   o      RGB      (do you use Working RGB - sRGB …   or sRGB IEC…)

There are several choices but of these two with the sRGB profile which one do you select?  I don’t know if they are the same or if one is more accurate or a better choice over the other one.  Thoughts? 

Posted by
nstuart
Oct 12, 2011 8:38am PDT
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nstuart
 

I use the sRGB IEC… one.  I’m not in front of a computer with PS on it right now, but if I remember correctly, (maybe not) you can set up a working RGB and a working CMYK color space in photoshop.  If the working RGB color space is set to sRGB IEC61966-2.1, then setting the document equal to the working RGB space is the same as setting it to the sRGB IEC…. space.

The working space is used by PS to display images that have no imbedded color space in it. Somewhere you can set up options that will give you a warning if the image being loaded does not contain the working color space, and ask if you’d like to convert to it.  By setting these options and the working space to sRGB, you’ll know the instant you open the image if you are in the correct color space.

Typically, images use 24 bit color (raw images use more ,but the jpg’s used with Booksmart only have 24).  This is well beyond the color resolution of most printers, and many displays.  Twenty four bit color means that 8 bits per pixel are assigned to each of Red Green and Blue.  Eight bits means that each color is represented by a number from 0 to 255 (2 raised the the 8th power minus 1).  Zero is the darkest, and 255 is the brightest.  Therefore, 0,0,0 is the blackest, and 255,255,255 is whitest.  Gamut is the range from blackest to whitest.  I don’t say from black to white, because this range varies from color space to color space. The difference between two color spaces can be the width of the gamut, the start of the gamut (black point) and the linearity of the gamut.  So if you have a red value of say, 130, it could be a different red color using sRGB than Adobe RGB.  That is why you should use the color space that Blurb is expecting.  It sees that value of 130 and converts it to the CMYK values the printer needs to accurately reproduce the expected red.

Mike

Posted by
Charybdis
Oct 12, 2011 2:26pm PDT
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Charybdis