Book Design and Imaging

Photo Spanning Two Pages

I’m in the process of designing my first book.  I have one very long photo that I want to span two pages.  What’s the best way to accomplish this?  In addition to Booksmart, I also have MS Publisher and InDesign at my disposal, though I suspect InDesign would be a steep learning curve for me.

 Thanks.

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Posted by
Acorn87
Jan 21, 2008 2:32pm PDT
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Acorn87
 

Create-a-full-bleed-spread-across-2-pages/

The same technique will work for a photo that is not a full two-page one, just choose a suitable template that has the space for the photo right up to the right hand edge, then insert a new (right hand) page using the same template, BokkSmart will put a mirror image of that template with the space for the photo hard up to the left hand edge. Well it has with the templates used, but I haven’t tried every one :-)

Then pop your photo into each as described in the above blog.

This book (not mine) has some good examples.

 Examples

.....Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Jan 21, 2008 3:03pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

This is not a strength of the Blurb software or process.

I am in the process of publishing one of their large books and I am doing it with InDesign. So here is the process  that you could consider.

Open InDesign and go to a new document. It will guide you through the size and type of document. Check the blurb site for InDesign specs for your book. Make Sure that you set the document for spreads—this will give you two pages together. One note, make sure that the color preference is set to RGB (just check the help file in InDesign, and search for color preference.

Then "place" Control D on the PC the image into the document. Arrange the image where you want it and besure that you have set the document for the bleed of one eighth of an inch—this is a part of the set-up process mentioned above.

One you are satisfied with that, save the document. Then go to File > Export and for a file type choose PDF. This will lead you through the PDF creation process. Two notes—do not choose spreads and be sure to select create for printing and check to make sure that it is making a pdf with inages at 300 dpi.

Once this document is created import it into PhotoShop and then expert each page seperately again ensuring that you set the jpegs to exported at 300 dpi. To make things easy choose smart names for the export—since there are just two pages here choose left and right, for exampe.

No you will have two jpgs the left page and the right page. Open the blurb tool and import these two images. Now you can place these into the blurb template. However, you will have to play around a little since the tool is a bit stupid and does not have an alignment guides. So where the image goes across the gutter you will have to "play a little" to ensure alignment. Once  you have alignmente you can check with the blurb test buttom (OK I admit that I can not remember what Blurb calls their test buttom and I don’t have time to go and look —but it is pretty obvious. Keep playing until the two seams match up and then you are good to go.

I realize this seems like a lot of steps—and it is—but it is also effective. Indesign will cut the image in half for you and you and it is ready to stick in the blurb tool. Also, I believe that someone said that InDesign CS3 will allow you to export pages directly to JPEGS but I do not have CS3 so I can not confirm.

Remember, all learning is good. Just dive in and enjoy the journey.

Rustoleum

Posted by
rustoleum
Jan 21, 2008 3:43pm PDT
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rustoleum
 

Rustoleum,

As you are, I did two custom full-bleed design on large format landscape, 13 by 11 inches and the other one is 10 by 8, with Adobe InDesign. I am aware that you do not use the latest version of Adobe CS3 package. At the time, I was not aware that I could do export JPGs straight out of InDesign CS3 by itself.

I don’t know IF that is correct, or I could be wrong, but I have read some issues in other forums pertaining to InDesign’s horrible JPG export. So, I sticked with little nutty, and long process of converting PDFs into Photoshop CS3 JPGs eventually. But the quality is so superior and professional-grade.

I think I want to do a quick experiment with two proof books – one with all nutty, lot of work with InDesign/Photoshop and the other one straight out of InDesign JPGs and import them into two proof books and see what happens.

I am currently working on other project pertaining to my recent cruise trip in December. I have been VERY fussy and thorough with quality of professional-grade.

While you say “all learning is good…” How true! I agree with that completely. Now with your quoted statement ”... just dive in and enjoy the journey.” Again, how true!

In my case, I work with my Adobe CS3 Premium on MacPro and MacBook Pro. For the “final” stage of book project, soft proofing procedure, it is done on MacPro. Along with Adobe CS3 Premium, I also work with Aperture on MacPro and MacBook Pro, where I have the access to huge hard drive capacity attached to MacPro over secured, closed network system at my residence. So I can open Aperture library files in one place, either with MacPro or MacBook Pro on the fly at any time. Well, I guess I am a bit off the beam when it comes to Aperture. But it is very, very useful tool especially for my situation dealing with thousands of raw (.NEF as in Nikon Electronic Format) photo formats.

Enuf babbling. Anyway, thanks for sharing with us about your insight and experience with InDesign. You didn’t say which version you are working with?

Cheers, Brian :)

Posted by
brianbonitz
Jan 21, 2008 4:53pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Thank to all for the suggestions.  I’ll start experimenting now.

Posted by
Acorn87
Jan 22, 2008 6:45pm PDT
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Acorn87
 

Acom87,

I have been using PageMaker for years. I didn’t wanted to switch to Adobe InDesign, when Adobe introduced totally brand-new, totally inside-out professional layout app at the time. Also I didn’t want to go with QuarksXpress, I prefer not to go into that area related to Quarks. Just because it is lousy app, period.

So I finally switched and purchased Adobe InDesign 1.0. It was a little difficult for me to adjust and getting used to. But the more I got my hands dirty under the hood of InDesign, the more comfort zone I eventually be felt with the app itself inside out. And I didn’t look back. That was a couple years ago and purchased upgrades and Premium packages at Adobe.

As for MS Publisher, I hesitate to say something about Publisher itself. I don’t know what to say. It is really not a good ideal publishing app. Maybe low-end, simple publishing app is what MS is designed for. But not ideally app for professional graphic designers or designers or even photographers’ toolbox to work with.

So, deep learning curve with InDesign application, it might be very deep for some people. Not really for me, it just that I adjust and getting used to InDesign’s UI, its brilliant technology to make things simple, but very powerful, professional layout app. It might be way too fluid and miserable to work with for anyone who do not understand how it works and why.

Best of luck with your experiment.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Jan 23, 2008 1:31am PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Acom87,

I realize that I fail to mention one helpful suggestion, that it be of an interest for you.

There is a couple of great “how to” training materials to help you get started working with powerful applications such as InDesign or other apps like Photoshop for example. Lynda dot com is one. The other one is Adobe Press Classroom Training Books on all products offered by Adobe Systems.

More information can be found at Adobe website at: adobe.com and look at its online store for more information on books itself. Or you can order book through Amazon or Barnes Noble Bookseller retail store or online. Totally up to you.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Jan 23, 2008 1:36am PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Thanks for the further details Brian.  I’ll look into those training materials to see what I’d be getting myself into.

Posted by
Acorn87
Jan 27, 2008 1:25pm PDT
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Acorn87