Book Design and Imaging

Image resolution question.

When I upload my finished book for publication will the final image resolution be changed from the original pictures taken by my 6 Megapixel camera on highest res. setting?

 I want to prevent pixellation as much as possible.

 

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Posted by
Neilluck
Jun 21, 2008 12:31pm PDT
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Neilluck
 

The photos will be "optimised" before uploading, which involves, where necessary, cropping them and changing them to 300dpi. If your photos are close to that anyway (say 200 – 400 dpi) there should be no problems with pixelation.

So photos taken with a 6Mp camera should be fine. Check for the warning signs that BookSmart pops up if photos are too small for the container, if you get one of those then there is a good chance that pixelation will occur.

Where I have a photo that is way too small for the container on the page, or way too large, I tend to resize them in Photohop prior to import, but most of the time that is not necessary.

.......Tony

 

Posted by
tfrankland
Jun 21, 2008 1:14pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

I’ve also had questions about DPI.  Booksmart says that the printers use 300 DPI but I noticed when I check the properties of the pictures that I take with my new Canon Rebel digital at 8MP, it says that the original size is 72 dpi.  Does that mean that my original photos are being set wrong?  Shouldn’t this resolution be higher?  When I print them they look great but I put them in a book (which didn’t show a yellow triangle) and I wasn’t happy with the quality compared to other book sites I’ve used. What am I doing wrong?

Posted by
phendryca
Jun 23, 2008 9:32am PDT
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phendryca
 

phendryca,

You need to convert your images from resolution of 72 to 300.

To do this, you need to have image editor application such as Adobe Photoshop CS3, or Photoshop Element, or similar image editing apps.

I also found the info through FAQ search, if you have done this venue, you will find many list of information on similar search queries…

What is the best resolution for the images in my book?
http://blurb.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/blurb.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=78

Also, you need to be sure that your photos are correctly set to color profile called sRGB, because Blurb BookSmart app is a sRGB app.

You are encouraged to learn more about sRGB and DPI resolution through FAQs search and through Blurb forums, where there are many discussion on the topic.

Hope that helps.
Brian
[A passionate Blurbarian]

Posted by
brianbonitz
Jun 23, 2008 11:58am PDT
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brianbonitz
 

phendryca,

Not sure what went wrong with the link I had provided, the forum seem to have it messed up by not including the entire link.

If you go FAQ link, conduct search query, you could try “best resolution” or other similar search keyword phrase queries. It is best if you get better search results if you have at least two or three search keyword all together, than one-word search keyword.

Again, hope that helps, no?
Brian
[A passionate Blurbarian]

Posted by
brianbonitz
Jun 23, 2008 12:02pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

I guess I’m really confused.  My photos were taken with my Canon Digital Rebel XT which is 8mp.   When I look at the picture info, it says the photo is 3456×2304 and is sRGB which Blurb says is much more than they need.  But if I look at the properties of the photo, it says it’s 72dpi.   I’m trying to understand all of this and I do quite a bit with Paint Shop Pro X2 but I still seem to be missing something. By the way, I printed the exact book and photos in the large format book through Mypublisher.com which is a lot more expensive, but the photos were perfect. When I did the same book here using the standard landscape, the pictures were pixilated.  I loved the book (ordered it in soft cover and image wrap) but was disappointed with the pictures. I’m working with Blurb tech support now, so hopefully they can help me before I do future books.

Posted by
phendryca
Jun 26, 2008 4:54pm PDT
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phendryca
 

I’m not an expert—but I think you may be confusing the monitor display (which is normally 72dpi) with the resolution needed for printing. I always check the container for the pixel dimensions needed and just crop to that. I’ve printed books going back to my first digital camera (way back in 2000, a whoping 1.3 mp camera), and as long as I respected the pixel dimension, I was fine. Are you doing heavy processing on your images? If they’re JPEG’s you will loose quality every time you work on/ save them. But since you say you’re working with tech support, I’ll leave it at that…

Amelia

Posted by
CasaDeWoof
Jun 26, 2008 7:51pm PDT
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CasaDeWoof
 

Amelia! Your info about jpeg files loosing quality is very intresting! I didnt know. Do you know which file type to use instead of jpeg while working with the pics?

/ Aiko

Posted by
AikoAichi
Jul 4, 2008 3:55am PDT
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AikoAichi
 

Aiko-

I’m not an expert, but if I know I will be saving my picture multiple times while working on it, I save it as a TIFF file.  Then, when I’m done, I’ll save it as a JPEG.  I have read on the forums that if you’re working with text, PNG is better than JPEG – at least when working with Blurb.  

That being said….I know I have had instances where I’ve done multiple changes and saves as JPEG, and there wasn’t a noticeable loss of quality – but as I said, I’m not an expert.  The only issues I’ve run into so far is when I tried to crop down too much.  I guess I complained too much and that’s why I got a nice long zoom lens for my birthday :)

 Regi 

Posted by
rbgool
Jul 4, 2008 6:12am PDT
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rbgool
 

Hello Aiko;

This note is really just to confirm what Amelia and Regina have said; and add comment for anybody else reviewing this post…

Opening and re-saving JPEG files multiple times WILL result in a loss of image quality…

The reason is that the JPEG format is a "lossy" compression tool. I.e it loses data each time the file is re-compressed. For 1/2/3 re-saves that may not present a noticeable problem – provided the file quality is good in the first place…

Even if you are only going to do a small amount of post-processing work then you should choose to save your work-in-progress file as a TIFF file. That is a "lossless" format. I.e it preserves all data all the time… Only convert your TIFF to JPEG at the end of the process when you are sure you have completed all processing work, and you’re happy with the results….

Moving a step back, you should also shoot in RAW format with your Canon Rebel; you will get MUCH better results with a PC converted JPEG than you ever will with an in-camera JPEG conversion…

If you’re unsure or uncomfortable about how to shoot & convert RAW files, then start by using the RAW + JPEG option on your file menu. That will give you two versions of the same file to work with; the JPEG that you’re comfortable with, and ther RAW file, which is the equivalent of a digital negative.

You can use Canon’s own DPP software that came with your Utilities disk to run the RAW conversion. Do as much post-processing in there as you can before you convert to TIFF; it’s a better option that Adobe Camera Raw… then you just convert & save, and then upload the TIFF file into PhotoShop (or similar) when you’re done.

Hope that helps…

Cheers;

Lee

Posted by
lkb-28
Jul 7, 2008 1:33am PDT
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lkb-28
 

Aah! Niice! Thank You! Both! I shall move over too TIFF immediately…/ Aiko

Posted by
AikoAichi
Jul 8, 2008 4:09pm PDT
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AikoAichi