Book Design and Imaging

Designing book in Adobe InDesign

Has anyone ever designed a book in InDesign instead of Using Booksmart? I found bookmark to be very limiting, and wanted to create my layouts in InDesign, but first I wanted to hear the opinions of other people who have done this process. My concern is exporting from InDesign as high print quality PDF files but I noticed BookSmart does not accept PDF files for some reason. Due to this I have to do an additional step of converting PDF files to JPEG files and in the process of converting files into different formats, I’m afraid that the quality of the text/type and image created in InDesign may be lost once converted into JPEG and then ripped even further during the printing process. Any thoughts on this? Anyone?

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
david_arias
Aug 13, 2008 12:36pm PDT
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david_arias
 

There are a number of threads on this topic, so doing a search of the forums would pay off whilst you are waiting for replies. This one in particular…

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/1/topics/3351

..........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Aug 13, 2008 1:00pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

Hello Tony,

I did see that thread, however, that did not answer my question. My question is more to do with the end results in doing this "converting process" from InDesign to PDF’s to Photoshop to JPEGs to BookSmart to Printing. I can convert my files no problem, but to be more specific, I wanted to know if anyone had previously done this, and what were the results when you got your printed book?What is the text quality like? Image quality?

Posted by
david_arias
Aug 13, 2008 1:55pm PDT
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david_arias
 

Hello Tony,

I did take your advice and I found another thread confirming a final printed result in suing this process…..Thanks. :)

thread link:

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/4/topics/1933

 

Posted by
david_arias
Aug 13, 2008 2:04pm PDT
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david_arias
 

You’re welcome. I look forward to seeing your post in a few weeks (months?) reporting on how your book turned out.

..........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Aug 13, 2008 2:34pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

This is how I made my book – but the type is rasterized to 300 dpi and turns out pixelated – both .jpg and .png I have tried both.

Please accept .pdf, Blurb!!

Posted by
leahlady
Aug 13, 2008 5:00pm PDT
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leahlady
 

Did you go direct from InDesign tdirect o  jpg/png Leah? Or did you go the InDesign -> PDF -> Photoshop -> jpg/png route?

I’ve been watching the InDesign related threads as I was awondering about getting InDesign as I’m doing more page layouts in Photoshop and that is taking too long. There seem to be mixed messages in the forums.

.........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Aug 13, 2008 11:25pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

I did my last book in InDesign (CS2). I exported as PDF then opened the PDF in Photoshop (CS2) and saved the files as PNG files then brought the PNG files into BookSmart. I rotated all my photos “off axis” (they weren’t straight across) and I didn’t have any jaggies. I can’t speak to the text as I used a hand written font and I doubt you’d be able to notice jaggies in it anyway. FWIW, I designed my pages to size at 300 dpi so that the BookSmart conversion engine didn’t have to touch my files

Tony: If you can afford InDesign I’d highly recommend it. It’s so much easier to “see” your book as a book in InDesign than Photoshop. Since it’s designed to make book type layouts it’s got so many more tools to speed up the process.

Amelia

Posted by
CasaDeWoof
Aug 14, 2008 7:48am PDT
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CasaDeWoof
 

Hi Amelia;

Like Tony, I have been taking a passing interest in the "InDesign" discussions, but I’m having real difficulty getting my head around a fundamental question…

Perhaps, as an experienced InDesign user, you can enlighten the dim…

I can’t understand why you would want to take a JPEG image, import it into InDesign, convert it to PDF and then re-convert it to JPEG (or PNG) in PhotoShop!

I just can’t see how that can’t result in a quality loss along the way!

I’m guessing that InDesign can also take on-board TIFF files, but the fundamental question still remains, why convert a TIFF to PDF, and then back to JPEG?

My gut instinct is always to keep the files as TIFF files for as long as possible, and only convert to JPEG at the last moment as a one-time exchange!

Grateful for your reply…

Cheers;

Lee

Posted by
lkb-28
Aug 14, 2008 8:28am PDT
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lkb-28
 

Hi Lee-
I’m not willing to call myself an “expert” but….
InDesign doesn’t need to “import” your photos. What you do is “place” them. It’s really just a link to the file. What’s great is that if you do something to that file, say color correct, you don’t have to do anything- it’s just a link so it will be updated in your InDesign file. You can keep your files in whatever format you want while using InDesign.
As to the why for the PDF/ Photoshop process? Well, BookSmart kinda forces that because it doesn’t accept PDF files. And InDesign makes it’s own type of file (kinda like how Photoshop makes PSD files) so you have to do something to get them from the InDesign file type to either JPG or PNG. The PDF step gives you your “book” with each page in sequence (and numbered) so that the process of pulling the file into PS and making sequential PNG files is simple. I don’t think you get any compression going through the PDF, but I could be wrong. As I said above, I rotated my photos off axis, and if there were going to be compression problems like jaggies I’m sure it would have been seen in all those non straight lines I have going on.
I hope that helps…
Amelia

Posted by
CasaDeWoof
Aug 14, 2008 8:53am PDT
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CasaDeWoof
 

Hi Amelia;

Thanks for that… The "link to" image file of course is the logical way to go, and is a great resource saver… one that BookSmart could do with implementing…

I understand the "why" you need to convert to PDF, but, I’ve done a little more homework on the subject… It appears that InDesign CS3 allows you to export the pages files directly to JPEG, so that saves the PDF step…

But what about TIFF files? Do you have any experience with using those in InDesign?

Lee

Posted by
lkb-28
Aug 14, 2008 9:11am PDT
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lkb-28
 

Hi Lee,

It is just that BookSmart could not understand PDF format. To do this, you need to rasterize PDF format into Photoshop and then export it as PNG or JPG. It works nicely for me. Please note that I did the book using Photoshop JPG export into BookSmart.

I am still working on this book project for quite some time using PNG format.

Hope that helps.

Cheers, Brian
A passionate Blurbarian

Posted by
brianbonitz
Aug 14, 2008 9:44am PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Hi Lee-
I can’t speak to TIFF files per se, but I know that InDesign will link to them just like JPG files so you would be fine. The bulk of my images are JPGs and when I need to fix something I do it in photoshop. In Design can link to the PSD file just the same. And a page can have multiple types of files linked. CS2 can also make JPG files- but I prefer the PNG files which it can’t make.
Amelia

Posted by
CasaDeWoof
Aug 14, 2008 10:40am PDT
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CasaDeWoof
 

Hi Brian;

Thanks for the note…

Yes; I understood the need to convert to PDF and then to JPG (or PNG) if you wanted to run InDesign -> BookSmart via Photoshop… but… that wasn’t my concern…

I can’t understand why there would NOT be a loss of quality in making these conversions of JPEG -> PDF -> JPEG (or PNG)???

What I was initially thinking about was designing the page layout in InDesign, but leaving the image containers blank (pretty much like a BookSmart template) and then using PhotoShop layers to add the images AFTER importing the InDesign page… To my mind, that would avoid the several file conversions, and would allow the use of a high-quality TIFF file right to the very end of the process…

I guess the way to find out is to download a trial of InDesign, and just play around… but InDesign is a pretty stiff investment for anybody who is not in the  graphics arena…

Cheers;

Lee

Posted by
lkb-28
Aug 14, 2008 11:04am PDT
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lkb-28
 

Hi Lee-
When I set up my InDesign file I set the specs to the exact size at 300dpi. Then when I exported to PDF I set my compression panel to none (you’re given the choice for color images, grayscale images and monochrome images individually). I did keep the “crop image data to frames” checked (that discards the parts of your image that you’ve cropped out using the frame and makes the file smaller).
My logic is that the file is set up to the exact requirements of Blurb and I’m not asking InDesign (when making the PDF), nor Photoshop (when making the PNGs) nor BookSmart (when uploading the data) to do any sort of compression. I have no idea if my logic is correct or not- but I’m happy with my results.

I agree that InDesign is pricy. That’s why I’m still on CS2!
Are you familiar with lynda dot com? They have great educational/ training videos on all kinds of software. Many of the titles have free chapters (ones that you can watch without becoming a member). You could probably get a fairly good overview of InDesign by checking out some of the free videos there.

Amelia

Posted by
CasaDeWoof
Aug 14, 2008 3:16pm PDT
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CasaDeWoof
 

Hi Lee and Amelia,

I agree that Adobe InDesign CS3 is pricy. But if you look at long-run trade-off investment, the dividends pay off nicely. It made a little workflow easier for creative professionals. And I know that holds very true of deep learning curve, but again, it is well worth it – if someone find InDesign app very useful. It might makes a lot of sense for creative professionals, it might not be making any sense for some. If use it every day, then it is well worth it. If not use it on a daily basis, I would definitely with you on that one.

To me, I love InDesign app since the first day Adobe introduced it a couple years ago. And I didn’t look back since then. I made a major investment on whole Premium CS2 package and it was worth it. So I upgraded to the current version.

It is matter of time, only time tells, I would think it is matter of when (I don’t know when it will be for) – before we know it, the next release of Adobe creative package version “soon to be” CS4.

Anyway, it is very good, lively discussion on the topic.

Cheers,
Brian, a passionate Blurbarian

Posted by
brianbonitz
Aug 14, 2008 4:49pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

I normally use TIFF files when working InDesign simply because its a bit more flexible when working with images placed from photoshop. TIFF files allow you to have a bit of more control over your photoshop image files since it maintains your working layers in Photoshop seperate without disrupting the original image. If at any point you need to edit or change something to your image you can simply go back to the TIFF file layers and later update the link in InDesign.  Keep in mind that InDesign doesn’t embed your TIFF files, it only places them, in other words, it links them to your InDesign file. The embbeding happens when you export from InDesign to High Quality PDF files. In my mind, any time you export a file and its translated to a different format, digital data can be lost, resulting in a lesser quality than that of the oringinal image.

But if you’re planning to work with InDesign, it will come in handy if you’re planning on creating custom layouts not offered by Booksmart. Since BookSmart layouts are offered as tamplates, there is only so much you can do with it. If you really wanted to create a unique book, and you don’t want to end up with a template layout that a lot of people will use, then InDesign is the way to go. However if you’re simply creating a book with mostly full and cropped images, then you’re better off using BookSmart since the software will do everything for you.

In my case, I wanted to create a page layout and arrange structured columns on a custom grid for text treatment and flexibility. This is something that BookSmart does not allow you to do as the software only offers basic text layout treatments. My book is still in the works, but I’m concerned that the"vector" text quality originated with InDesign will lose quality when raterized from PDF to JPEGS. If you’ve ever tried doing text in Photoshop, you will notice that if you zoom in enough, the text eventually becomes "pixelated". When using "vector" text generated by softwares such as Illustrator or InDesign, you’ll notice that no matter how much you zoom in, text always remains sharp and crisp, and no pixelation is generated.

Anyways, I will give it a shot once my book is done, do all the necessary file convertions, and print one out to see the results.

David

Posted by
david_arias
Aug 28, 2008 5:30pm PDT
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david_arias
 

David,

I recently printed a 10×8 book using the InDesign – Photoshop – BookSmart workflow and I was pleased with the results. InDesign gave me the design flexibility I desired, and the 300 DPI .png files flowed from PS into BookSmart without a hitch. While you lose out on vector text, the high resolution of the rasterized pages & minimal compression of the .png files seem to yield fairly good quality prints.

A close inspection of  the printed pages in my book reveals that the type loses sharpness; this is more visible with larger text, but apparent on the small body copy as well. Having carefully checked the page files after they were rasterized, the quality loss may be due to the limits of the digital press. My limited experience with presses has shown a noticeable difference between text quality on digital versus offset presses (with vector text, even).

 However, I have not seen a Blurb book published using text from BookSmart, so I cannot compare. It is entirely possible that the rasterization process, even if done carefully, inevitably results in slightly lower quality text. A fair trade-off for the flexibility the InDesign workflow provides, in my opinion.

I should mention that I’ve had the book for over a month and never noticed the text quality until now, as my immediate concern was with the accurate reproduction of the photographs. At normal reading distances, the text is more than satisfactory.

Posted by
jlevasseur
Aug 29, 2008 11:27pm PDT
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jlevasseur
 

Thanks for sharing you experience with the quality of your book, it sure encourages me to give it a shot myself.

Posted by
david_arias
Aug 30, 2008 6:12pm PDT
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david_arias
 

I finally ordered a book and got it on the mail today. The book’s quality is surprisingly good. I was concerned about the process in taking the design from Indesign to PDF to PS to JPEG and then through the final ripping process at the printer. Aside from that, may main concern was with the text. Since I was using a fairly small type size and then turned from vector to a rasterized jpeg, legibility was a concern. The text quality is not as sharp and high as you would get from an offset printer, but I never expected that either. However, under all circumstances and different processes, I must say, it turned out fairly decent. The type seems a tiny bit fuzzy, but still very legible. In conclusion, based from the price point from a one off 260 page printed book I would say I’m satisfied with the results.

David.

Posted by
david_arias
Sep 22, 2008 5:36pm PDT
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david_arias
 

I’ve been looking at InDesign over the last few days and am interested in taking the plunge.  Is anyone able to tell me whether text will roll over from page to page (MS word style)?  In other words could it actually be used to write a book in?

Posted by
aop27
Sep 27, 2008 5:37am PDT
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aop27
 

Yes, aop, you can link text frames together so that text flows back and forth from page to page.

I have used InDesign CS3 for 2 books.  Since I’m using CS3 I can export directly to JPG, which I then place into booksmart.  I use fonts as small as 6pt on some pages and everything comes through sharp as a tack!  I definitely recommend this approach.

 JJ

Posted by
vintageradio
Sep 28, 2008 12:11am PDT
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vintageradio
 

Thanks for that JJ – I’ve downloaded the one month trial and started saving my pennies.

Posted by
aop27
Sep 28, 2008 2:15pm PDT
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aop27
 

I’ve now taken the plunge and bought InDesign.  After goodness knows how long designing with MS Word all I can say is WOW!!!  This package is the dog’s wotsits.  Its superb!  For anyone looking to find something that can handle everything that MS Word fails on – this is the package.

I recomend the courses at lynda.com at $25 per month as well

Posted by
aop27
Oct 5, 2008 3:05pm PDT
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aop27
 

aop27,

Congrats on your decision to invest Adobe InDesign.

However, I would like to make a little clarification about the difference between MS Word and Adobe InDesign. When you compare MS Word to Adobe InDesign, it is not that they can compare.

MS Word is a word processing application, while Adobe InDesign IS a layout-design application. As you notice, it is widely used by creative professionals use Adobe InDesign for designing high-end professional layout application. I would think it is probably a deep learning experience for you.

I used to use Adobe PageMaker for years. When Adobe introduced InDesign a couple years ago, and I took a look at InDesign and fell in love with it and switched to InDesign from PageMaker and didn’t look back since then. I know it can be quite very fluid, yet quite powerful layout app. But it serves you well to achieve beautiful output for your book.

Have fun working and learning the ropes of InDesign. You know where to ask for some help, right here. But if for some reason, you also can get some help at Adobe User-to-User InDesign forums as well. Lynda dot com is quite nice, too.

Cheers,
Brian {a passionate Blurbarian}

Posted by
brianbonitz
Oct 6, 2008 2:49pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Thanks for your note Brian – I completely agree that InDesign is not a Word substitute for most of what Word does.  In terms of the desktop publishing & design stuff that I was trying to get Word to do though its a vast vast improvement.

 

& you’re certainly right about the learning curve!

Posted by
aop27
Oct 7, 2008 1:34pm PDT
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aop27
 

You are most welcome, aop27.

Cheers, Brian {a passionate Blurbarian}

Posted by
brianbonitz
Oct 12, 2008 10:09pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

For any of you interested…I’d like to share a useful link on "a tutorial for good typography in InDesign – Setting up a baseline grid"

http://typophile.com/node/47265

Enjoy,

David

Posted by
david_arias
Nov 24, 2008 3:12pm PDT
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david_arias
 

I designed 90% of my 440 page book in Paint Shop Pro using blank canvases fitting the necessary resolution for my book size. In my case 2888 pixels x 2475 pixels a page . I built every page from a blank transparent template using these dimensions and set the DPi to 300DPi minimum. I then saved each page as a JPEG in Paint shop ,saving at the highest quality allowed. I then just imported these pages as JPEGSs to Booksmart.
I tend to use the full image page template with slight border in picture page options then colour match the border to my designed page to hide border.This allows an unoticeable safety buffer for trimming on imported pages.The results are fab with both text and images, rarely any jpeg artefacts or trouble with quality. If I want to add page numbers on my imported full pages I use the full text page with image behind it option, this also has a border that you can RGB colour match to your externally designed page for a safe trim area. I only add page number at page foot and nothing else:)
Its a fab option for freedom of design while fitting the blurb software

Posted by
artpapa
Nov 25, 2008 2:24am PDT
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artpapa
 

Hi David,

Thanks for the heads up on the link to typophile dot com article on the topic. Very nice, useful info.

Thanks again for all you do!
Cheers, Brian {a passionate Blurbarian}

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 25, 2008 12:48pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

@ JJ

 Hi, I tried your approach using InDesign CS4 and exporting directly into jpeg files, but in Booksmart (I have not yet tried ordering a book) text appears quiet unsharp, even in 12 pt. No problem with 14pt bold however. Was there any difference in the way your text appeared on the screen in Booksmart and how it appeared in the printed book ? Or does this have something to do with the choice of fonts (depending on which font you choose it appears more or less sharper ?) ? As I would like to have some text at 11 or 12 pt in my book I’d be grateful for any input…

 

Posted by
evandenhaute
Nov 29, 2008 2:37am PDT
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evandenhaute
 

Evan – see my post on a similar design a couple of weeks ago here:

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/4/topics/2849#posts-19624

 

 

Posted by
aop27
Nov 30, 2008 4:35am PDT
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aop27
 

I have been meaning to add this to the forum, but never found the time to do so. Anyways, earlier I had talked about the result of my portfolio book created in Indesign, using Blurb’s services. Anyway, for those of you who are interested, here are some images from the actual printed version.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ariasdavid/sets/72157607462030614/

 

Cheers,

David

Posted by
david_arias
Mar 12, 2009 3:41pm PDT
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david_arias
 

Good looking book David, that must have taken many, many hours to produce. Thanks for sharing those images.

So would you recommend InDesign and that InDeswign -> PDF -> Photoshop -> JPEG/PNG approach? I think from a previous post you used JPEG?

.........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Mar 12, 2009 3:59pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

Thanks Tony.

Yes, I’d recommend the never ending process you described if you’re using InDesign. On this book I used JPEGS. I know that from InDesign CS3 you can now export 300 px/in resolution JPEGS, which lessens the process, but I have not tried that route yet…maybe for the next one.

It would be lovely if Blurb would actually let you import PDF files onto Booksmart. Until then, I guess the painful process will have to do.

Happy book making!

~ David

Posted by
david_arias
Mar 25, 2009 1:37pm PDT
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david_arias
 

No. Blurb should not provide PDF import into Booksmart.

They should provide PDF upload – for that is exactly what BookSmart uploads as far as I’m aware.

I have to wonder if Blurb staff are still listening?  I guess I’ll just have to keep complaining at regular intervals.

Maybe some enterprising individual can figure out the handshaking to their upload site and write a little Java program to allow direct uploads of PDFs… but no doubt that would be classed as "reverse engineering"!

Posted by
cbnewham
Mar 26, 2009 12:54am PDT
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cbnewham
 

cbnewham,

No need to complain anymore about PDF uploads. We know this is a feature that nearly everyone wants and as we’ve said before, we’ve been looking into it. I can definitely tell you that we are expecting to offer a PDF-only workflow soon. What I cannot tell you is exactly when or hint at possible time frames for obvious reasons (testing, performance, etc.). Look for an announcement at some point this year.

Thanks for your patience on this one.

– Kathy

Posted by
kathybad
Mar 26, 2009 7:46am PDT
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kathybad
 

I created my book in Adobe InDesign, as recommended. This way, I was able to control the placement of text (poetry) and images. I imported my images into InDesign as hi-res tiffs (300 dpi).
When I completed the layout of the book in InDesign, I exported each page as a (maximum – no compression) jpg, following the instructions (because Book Smart does not recognize pdfs). Unbeknownest to me, however, each page became a low-res jpg and was no longer 300 dpi. Therefore, when I inserted each jpg page into the BookSmart template, each page was now lo-res. I was not aware of this. When I received the book, I was appalled at how terrible it looked. and only then realized that exporting to jpg caused my pages to lose the desired resolution of dpi.
I was following instructions, and now I’m very upset, as I can’t use any of the books. Please help!!!

Posted by
fforman
Mar 29, 2009 6:15pm PDT
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fforman
 

fforman,

I can understand why you are unhappy with your books. The answer is in the posts above! So have a read and  you’ll see there that this is a known problem with InDesign and the recommended route is InDesign—> PDF—> Photoshop—> PNG—> BookSmart.

Plus go to the FAQs and you’ll see near the top of the list one called "Can I Import My Own Design Into BookSmart?". In the last paragraph of that there is a link to a Blog Post where one of the Blurb technical team details this approach.

.........Tony

Posted by
tfrankland
Mar 30, 2009 12:43am PDT
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tfrankland
 

Thanks for your feedback Kathy.

It would be nice to know when PDF Upload will be introduced although  I know you can’t pre-announce features.

I hope it will appear this year – it would be a great help.

cbn

 

Posted by
cbnewham
Mar 30, 2009 4:21am PDT
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cbnewham
 

I have been postponing my book uploads until pdf support would be included in booksmart. My question is less related to booksmart, though, but more so with uploading.

Would you allow for pdf uploads using third-party software? I mean, blurb’s making monoy from producing books, not software. So if you’d make all the specs available, you would really have something to offer (and produce more books)!

Posted by
foto18
Apr 5, 2009 4:53am PDT
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foto18
 

I uploaded my first book using InDesign exported jpegs. From InDesign—-> Export—-> Jpeg—-> 300 dpi. I then just dropped them in. I got my book back today and it seems fine. The images are clear and the text is mostly clear. I used a variety of text sizes, but my body copy is all san serif, thin line, 10 pt and it is fine. My captions are the same only 9 pt, and they are also fine. This seems like an okay option, but I will see how my other book looks after going from InDesign PDF to Photoshop to PNGs.

Posted by
kristawoods
Apr 6, 2009 6:43pm PDT
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kristawoods
 

I forgot to say my book was landscape portrait and premium paper. I also made my pages the exact bleed size and there were no gaps on the edges or pixelation. So far so good.

Posted by
kristawoods
Apr 6, 2009 6:44pm PDT
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kristawoods
 

I used the InDesign > PDF > Photoshop > PNG method outlined on this site and it worked very well.One tip I would give is to avoid the use of the JPG format whenever possible in your project. Remember that JPG was designed to create very small files and does this by discarding some image data every time it saves or resaves an image. That means every time you go back to adjust the levels, the colors or anything else, the image quality is dropped down another level with every "save."My advice for those using InDesign is to open the original JPG images from your camera, edit them how you see fit, save the images as Photoshop files and never enter the land of JPG again. You can import these into InDesign just as you would a JPG.When you convert the PDF in Photoshop, save the individual pages as PGNs rather than JPGs. Like the Photoshop format, PNG is a "lossless" image format that retains all the original image data. You should get sharper images and especially sharper text using PNG. I think some people are afraid of PNG because they are less familiar with it.

These tips will significantly increase the overall size of your project on your hard drive but, really, who cares? (My 80-page book sucked up about 2.5GB.) When you’re done, burn the whole project to a single 50-cent DVD-R, delete the old files and you’ll have plenty of space for your next project. :)

Posted by
lhouck
Apr 9, 2009 1:50pm PDT
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lhouck
 

i want to make my own book about my life

Posted by
sassy1234
Apr 10, 2009 3:48pm PDT
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sassy1234
 

It seems as if the overall concensus is to not export a page directly from CS3 to a JPG (Blub’s FAQ’s note this also) but to instead take the CS3 - PDF – Photoshop – JPG/PNG route.

Does anyone know if the problem with exporting a layout directly to a JPG is exclusive to CS3 or if it will also be a problem using the new CS4?

Posted by
kenordstrom
Apr 12, 2009 1:34pm PDT
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kenordstrom
 

Can someone pelase provide a link to the source document for the optimal PDF settings required for the CS3 to PDF to JPG/PNG conversion?

Posted by
Ukalady
Apr 13, 2009 11:48am PDT
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Ukalady
 

Ukalady,

go to Search FAQs. The second FAQ is "can I import my own design into BookSmart". In the last paragraph of that you will see a reference to a Blurberati Blog Post. Follow that link.

........Tony

 

Posted by
tfrankland
Apr 13, 2009 12:40pm PDT
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tfrankland
 

Ok, so I just figured out that Adobe Acrobat Professional 8 will export each page of a PDF as a separate 300 dpi PNG automatically under File – - Export—Image—PNG and then it names them in a batch-like way – filename_1.png, filename_2.png .. etc. Does anyone think that this method would give the same quality as Indesign—PDF—Photoshop—PNG?

Posted by
kristawoods
Apr 21, 2009 10:33pm PDT
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kristawoods
 

Not to mention it takes about a sixteenth of the time to do it in Acrobat than it takes to generate and save each PNG in Photoshop.

Posted by
kristawoods
Apr 21, 2009 10:37pm PDT
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kristawoods