Book Design and Imaging

What happens if you ignore the gamut warnings but like the soft proof?

Hello,

So….I’ve mentioned in previous threads that I’ve got some serious gamut issues with a wedding book that I’m working on.  Basically, this was a fall wedding with lots of colorful mums, other flowers – even the tablecloths – and many of the images were taken at sunset.   As a result, the images are very saturated with color, but realistically so.

To get rid of any gamut warnings, I’ve got to desaturate the colors to the point that the images become completely muddy and lifeless.

These were shot in 4×5, so I’m dealing with hundreds of 100MB+ files.  I can’t play around too much without an extraordinarily slow workflow.

QUESTION: If I’m satisfied with the proof in Photoshop (and my workflow is fully color-calibrated), will I get something on or close to the proof, despite the gamut warnings?  

If my only choice is to either desaturate the image completely, OR ignore the gamut warnings and be satisfied with an orange flower that’s close, but not perfect, I’ll go with the latter. 

Help!  Thanks!!!!! 

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
Scott99999
Sep 27, 2008 12:27pm PDT
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Scott99999
 

I have been trying to softproof and check the gamut, and in many cases, I’ve tried to correct to make the softproofing look good, and I’ve accepted the out of gamut.  My results have been positive.  I do have to say that none of the pictures that I’ve done have had significant areas out of gamut, they’ve just been minor portions – mainly in the reds and greens – and I’ve been satisfied with the result.

But (disclaimer alert!) I’m not a professional, and I don’t tend to be overly picky either.  Hopefully someone else with more experience will chime in, but I thought I’d let you know my experience.  One suggestion…you may be best served to print a test book with the pictures that you are most concerned about.  That way you can see for yourself if the result is acceptable or not.

Hope this helps.  Happy Blurbing!

Regi

Posted by
rbgool
Sep 27, 2008 1:17pm PDT
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rbgool
 

just wondering how you ended up making out? i am having the same problem and wondering about the gamma issues.

Posted by
kellyhale
Nov 7, 2008 2:27am PDT
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kellyhale
 

Hi everybody,

I have te same question.  Does somebody have a book printed  dispite the gamut warning? And what was the result? It looks fine in soft proofing. So do I have to worry a lot about the garmut warning?

Thanks for the answer.

Yvonne

 

Posted by
YvonneSmits
Nov 15, 2008 4:17am PDT
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YvonneSmits
 

Hi Guys,

I’m just sending off my first Blurb order so don’t have the physical proof yet, but I’ve been dealing with the same issue with my book, and I’ve designed/printed lots of other non-Blurb books/magazines, etc. in the past. Here’s my take on this:

—First, do you have the B3 Program icc profile? Get it if not. B3 is a limited invitation-only Blurb program. Search around for it here on this site.

—With the B3 icc profile (which is targeted to a specific Indigo press that Blurb uses for its B3 Custom Workflow), you soft proof in Photoshop. (you can soft proof with any CMYK profile but why not use the one that Blurb is providing?) This is what I did because many of my book images include a very Hot Pink color. I know from experience that Hot Pink (or any super-saturated color) will not reproduce well in CMYK printing. It’s the nature and one of the limits of offset printing. The gamut differences between what you see on a monitor and what you see on an offset-printed piece of paper can be great, depending on the image characteristics. It’s the nature of the process. (multi-channel inkjet can better at this in many cases but we’re not talking about inkjet here)

—Softproofing through the Blurb icc profile will approximate what you’re going to get back from Blurb. If you can live with that, you’re ready to go. No need to worry about the gamut warnings because you are seeing what will happen (in theory). In my case, several of the Hot Pinks in different images went very gray/muddy in the soft proof, as I expected. For the ones that were just too flat/muddy and unrealistic looking, I simply replaced those images with others where the pink was not so saturated.

—There’s no need to desaturate the images on your end because it will be done for you by the RGB > CMYK process of printing the book. The soft proof is the visual representation of this.

—Note that you have to purchase the Custom Workflow option in order to have your book printed using this B3 custom icc profile. Blurb has explained to me that the profile is for ONE specific Indigo printer (which makes sense) and that you get other benefits with the Custom Workflow as well. I’m actually thinking of NOT buying the Custom Workflow and just seeing what happens with the Standard workflow. But then, I’m only making a personal book. It’s not a wedding book for a client! If I were making a wedding book for someone, I’d pay the extra and go with the Custom Workflow and make full use of the B3 profile.

Hope that helps. And I’ll let you know how my book turns out. You do the same.

Haraldo

Posted by
haraldo2
Nov 15, 2008 9:30am PDT
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haraldo2
 

Thanks Haraldo. Your information is very helpfull.

I’ll let you know how my book turns out. It may take a few weeks, but I will post the result here.

Yvonne

 

Posted by
YvonneSmits
Nov 16, 2008 2:58am PDT
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YvonneSmits
 

Hi Everyone,

Miy book turned out well. With a few pictures I ignored the gamut waring, and they look just fine. So  there is is no need to get worried about that. The only thing that’s a little minus is that the pictures are slightly darker than on my monitor. Inspite of te calibaration en softproofing. So thats a good lesson voor the next book.

The premiumpaper is very good and so is the binding.

Yvonne 

 

Posted by
YvonneSmits
Dec 5, 2008 1:00am PDT
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YvonneSmits
 

Glad your book turned out well, Yvonne. So did mine. My review’s here:
http://forums.blurb.com/forums/7/topics/4517

Other people have mentioned the “dark” pictures but mine were as perfect as they could be (for the insides). I didn’t use the premium paper but I did use the B3 workflow.

Onward!

Haraldo

Posted by
haraldo2
Dec 6, 2008 9:28pm PDT
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haraldo2