Book Design and Imaging

InDesign CS3 and color profile

Hello,
I have accurately read the way of getting out the maximum from full bleed template here:

http://blurberatiblog.com/index.php?s=cs3&Submit=Search

But I have a question about that. InDesign CS3 does NOT embed color profile info into JPG exported (and previous versions neither), so all the JPGs created with CS3 and imported into Booksmart will not have any color space information.
Isn’t that a problem?

Best regards

Replytopic_b_normal
Posted by
Esfel
Sep 17, 2007 1:46am PDT
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Esfel
 

Hi!

 wow that’s a big issue here, would be nice to have some feedback from Blurb on that. I did all my design using inDesign and exported using jpegs, accordingly to Blurb’s advice.

 I will receive my book in a few days…

Herve 

Posted by
peitreq6
Nov 15, 2007 12:51pm PDT
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peitreq6
 

What is the best way to learn the indesign I heard that it was great…thanks janis..I just got my book and it looked great..I just used there templates

Posted by
photowidget
Nov 15, 2007 8:07pm PDT
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photowidget
 

Photowidget,

Well, if you remember those days using Adobe PageMaker application, it was pretty neat app. But then when Adobe released first version of InDesign. I made a quick investment decision with InDesign and I didn’t look back since then.

I would imagine that it would be a deep learning curve for you. If you are up for the challenge, go for it. I don’t know what is your primary purpose with InDesign CS3 app, if you use it fairly often or on a daily basis, then you want to consider it. But if you work with a one-time project or do a small project from time to time, it might not be for you.

InDesign application itself is quite powerful. Yes, very powerful application – and very professional layout application. It is not like a Microsoft Publisher, Publisher is more of pre-designed application, it has all templates and it does the rest for you. With InDesign, it is absolutely NOT a Microsoft Publisher, it is truly, truly professional designers’ toolbox, just as any with Adobe applications.

That is to say, it can be difficult application to work with InDesign, especially if you don’t understand how to set up bleeding, gutter or setting up ICC profile, or preflight checklist, or exporting different kind of PDF files, and all that sort of thing like that. Again, InDesign app is truly awesome and powerful, and professional layout application.

Be prepared for a deep learning curve, though. You might want to consider a 30-day try out period, and you can download it at Adobe website for that. If you go for that venue, BE KINDLY ADVISED that you must READ instructions on installing the application, especially with CS3 applications. When your InDesign application (try out for 30 days expired), it is important that you understand how to uninstall the apps. DO NOT EVER, ever drop and drag the app or its files off to trash bin. It is IMPORTANT that you follow and read the instructions on how to install (and eventually uninstall any CS3 application(s)).

Just because I have seen lot of discussion going on at Adobe user-to-user forums about the problem with Installation process, the “side effect” of CS3 installation and uninstallation. I don’t want to scare you this, but it is just that I want you to be aware, and know what to expect and understand the consequence if you don’t follow through. Just my two cent advice.

Hope that helps and good luck with your consideration about InDesign etc.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 15, 2007 9:15pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Esfel,

If you “place” the images into InDesign document from Photoshop or third-party imaging editor application, be sure that you check the option “Show Import Options”. Once selected, it opens other dialogue box ask you two options, “Color:” and “Rendering Intent:”. To do this, perform this task by pull down menu inside Color option to select whatever color profile assign for that image.

Usually, only IF you assigned the image with correct color profile, InDesign automatically recognize whatever color profile you assigned in that imaging editing application.

I like the best about Photoshop CS3, along with Adobe Design Premium package (including professional apps such as Photoshop, Flash, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, so on…, that includes InDesign app) is smooth workflow rather coolly and nicely between Adobe apps.

It is just that you need to understand the functionality on how and what InDesign is designed to do specific task and all. It is NOT a Image editing app, it just that it recognizes any file format it receive any placement of files into InDesign document.

As you may have notice that when you place any files, InDesign automatically “links” that placement of that file to InDesign document. So, if you move that file around, or delete that file and you open InDesign document, and it looks for that placed file. It just “knows” where, what and how. It is a bit complicated application, but it is important that you understand how it works, how you place files, and how you do with them.

Let’s say if you have had placed an image file in InDesign document and saved. Few days later, you didn’t like the color of image. You would want to change whatever reason you want to do with that image and saved that image file. Few days later, or few hours later, and you open InDesign document (and that placed image file you place days ago), it remembers and recognized that image file has changed, it asks you to re-link – so that it updates that image file into InDesign document for you.

Hope that helps.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 15, 2007 9:33pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

Has anyone made a posting on the use of InDesign and had good results. The quality of my exported Jpegs are dreadful. I use CorelDraw with very good results yet would like to use InDesign for obvious reasons.

Posted by
RJP
Nov 17, 2007 2:42am PDT
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RJP
 

Perhaps I should have said in the last post that I was using InDesign to make full page layouts for a Blurb Book. Exporting to pdf and then in Acrobat change to jpeg before importing into Blurb book. The pdfs are good yet the jpegs are poor and even poorer when imported into Blurb.

Any suggestions or pointers to previous postings are very welcome.

Posted by
RJP
Nov 17, 2007 5:31am PDT
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RJP
 

Using an Adobe98 workflow in CS3, once the color settings are synced in the suite (via the Bridge) and your preference is to "Preserve embedded profiles" you can export a press quality pdf from ID with a profile embedded. No jpegs to worry over.

Here is my newbie question: Does blurb have press profiles to download for soft proofing their paper types?

Posted by
cvgbcom200
Nov 17, 2007 5:34am PDT
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cvgbcom200
 

RJP-

"Perhaps I should have said in the last post that I was using InDesign to make full page layouts for a Blurb Book. Exporting to pdf and then in Acrobat change to jpeg before importing into Blurb book. The pdfs are good yet the jpegs are poor and even poorer when imported into Blurb. "

 

Do you mean that blurb does not accept a pdf?

Re your workflow: Why not lay your page out in Photoshop if what you want is CM jpegs? 

Posted by
cvgbcom200
Nov 17, 2007 5:41am PDT
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cvgbcom200
 

RJP- Having read a bit more about blurb’s methods:

A better (higher quality) solution would be to lay your page out in Photoshop convert to srgb space and save as a png.

 

Posted by
cvgbcom200
Nov 17, 2007 5:55am PDT
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cvgbcom200
 

RJP,

Have a look at this:
http://blurberatiblog.com/index.php/2007/09/04/importing-pdfs-export-your-layout-from-adobe-cs3-into-booksmart/

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 17, 2007 5:53pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

For those who have miserable, fuzzy and jazzy looks on Booksmart by importing Photoshop images (jpg), in fact there is a forum discussion on the topic – the last time it was discussed August 2007, have a look at this:

“Final print quality of font when saving in JPG (format)”, here:
http://forums.blurb.com/forums/1/topics/284

That is to say, BookSmart application itself is definitely a bug problem for that matter. I am remain hopeful that printing situation works out ok. I think I am going to take a significant risk go ahead order my book and see what happens. At that time when I get the book, I’ll report it back with snapshot of fuzzy, jazzy look on BookSmart app AND compare it with the book published and see the evidence and I guess it speaks for itself.

Hope that helps.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 17, 2007 5:58pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

And other helpful tips and tricks… here:

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/2/topics/14

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 17, 2007 6:03pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

cvybcom200,

The color profile and ICC print profile for soft proofing, there is more information on that URL below, here:

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/4/topics/1185

Note, there are two links in my post that refers to PDF file and ICC print file. Please note that you need to have Photoshop, or InDesign, or Illustrator application to make it work with soft proofing, and be sure to place the ICC print file in the right place on your computer. I use on my Machintoshes (MacPro, iMac and MacBook Pro 17”).

In that PDF file, when working with soft proofing, read the direction or instruction on how to make it work, it is a bit complicated. But once you “get it”, then it works out nicely for you.

Hope that helps.

Posted by
brianbonitz
Nov 17, 2007 6:10pm PDT
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brianbonitz