Book Printing

slightly red color cast

I’ve made a second book with Blurb. I want to state that the quality of the books is quiet nice but the last one has a slightly red color cast on all images, most visible on skin tones. It’s not my intention to ask a reprint or what ever, i just want to know how I can (if possible) avoid this in future use.
My worklow:
Pictures taken in JPG, Adobe rgb, nikon d200
Basic postproces in Lightroom 2.3, Windows XP enviroment
Final postproces in Photoshop cs3. Pictures are also cropped to the disired pixeldimensions as stated in the Blurb Program.
After postprocessing: convert the colorspace to sRGB in Photoshop.
Soft proofing the pictures in photoshop (HP Indigo semimatte 5000 profile – turnded off paper white) and adjust the picture on screen (calibrated with Spyder elite, native white point, 105 candela white, 0.35 candela black, 2.2 gamma). Unsharp mak in Photoshop.
Import in Blurb program.
On screen the pictures look nice, without colorcast. Printing on my HP 9180 also give me the result that i want.
Is there a possibility that I can proof the Blurb outcome (color cast,...)?
Thanks in advance… Lieven

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Posted by
liecat
May 3, 2009 3:23am PDT
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liecat
 

I am curious about one thing.. I notice you mentioned you take photos with your Nikon dSLR (D200) using JPEG. I always take photos with my Nikon dSLR using ‘native’ digital negative formatted in .NEF or also known as RAW format.

Cordially, Brian {a passionately Blurbarian}

Posted by
brianbonitz
May 3, 2009 3:09pm PDT
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brianbonitz
 

You’re absolutely right about this, i also take normally “Nef” pictures. On this occasion however, it was in Jpeg. In order to find out what possibilly could prevent the slightly red cast i tried to give you as much information as i could.

Posted by
liecat
May 3, 2009 3:17pm PDT
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liecat
 

You may want to try to following workflow instead:

 1. From Adobe RGB space, crop to the desired dimension.

2. Do not adjust the picture on screen according to the HP indigo printer soft proof. Instead, convert the image from Adobe RGB space to the HP indigo printer space. The color space conversion engine will do the out of gamut conversion for you. You don’t have to play with the saturation or hue sliders yourself. You will find your histogram now have clipped information on both sides, which is ok since you’re converting from a wide gamut space to a narrower gamut space.

3. After converting to HP indigo color space, if you don’t like what you see, you can play with the adjustments a bit with soft proofing on, making sure you don’t get out of gamut. This step is seldom necessary.

4. When you’re happy with the final look, convert the image to sRGB space. You’ll find the histogram well within the two boundary limits. Soft proofing the image with gamut warning should show no out of gamut areas. The image is now ready for import into the Blurb program.

One other thing is where did you get the HP printer profile? How do you know that is the correct profile? Blurb has a B3 program and publishes an ICC profile. The profile is actually a CMYK profile. If you just take any HP printer profile downloaded from the Internet and use it to soft proof the image according to your described workflow, you have just included many outside factors, including the suitability of the profile, the accuracy of your monitor calibration, the accuracy of your own color judgement.

I think if you use your original jpeg images and just do the crop and sRGB conversion without doing any soft proofing, you should expect a decent outcome from Blurb without any color cast. I made one book without softproofing and it worked out fine. If color accuracy is paramount, you should join the B3 program, Blurb will provide you with a printer profile and you will send them the book using the color profile workflow option, which costs a bit more.

Posted by
Michael1787
May 7, 2009 2:14pm PDT
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Michael1787
 

My photos also had a bit of a magenta/red cast.

Posted by
CaroT
May 22, 2009 6:43am PDT
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CaroT