CapnScrappy's Posts

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Rotating pictures on bookify
Bookify

Hi, You can rotate within Bookify. One the photo is added to a layout, just select. You’ll see a toolbar show with a rotate button.
Cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 7, 2010 12:24am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Removing a page
Bookify

Hi All. Just last Thursday (Oct 28th) we released an update to Bookify that should fix this usability issue. Since books must have an even number of pages when you deleted a page it would add a blank page. Now, if you delete a page it still adds a blank page as a buffer, but clicking delete page twice will then delete both that page and the buffer page.

Long story short, it should be easier to delete single pages now.
cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 1, 2010 4:31pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
photo border help
Bookify

Thanks Tony. You are correct, If an images touches the edge of the page, or “bleeds” in book design speak, it cannot have a border. This is because all pages are trimmed slightly (by about 1/8th inch) on all sides so the borders might be trimmed as well. If you’d like to use borders choose a layout that offers some margin or space between it and the edge of the page.
cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 1, 2010 4:27pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Bookify Webinar 26 Oct 2010
Bookify

Hi there –
Thanks! glad you enjoyed the webinar. Yes, we’re updated Bookify weekly.
cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 1, 2010 4:22pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Bookify restrictions
Bookify

You can actually use this discount with books created with BookSmart. I’m sorry for the Cyrillic character limitation. We’re trying to expand the character sets supported within Bookify.
Best, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 1, 2010 4:20pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
blacks in background to match blacks in images
Book Design and Imaging

Hi Liz,
A few answers for you.

1. 160 max is 80 leaves (front and back printed pages). We hope to expand this number, but need to make sure the binding can hold with the thicker paper.

2. To export please use the pdf job options settings which came with the templates or can be downloaded here: http://www.blurb.com/guides/pdf_to_book
Instructions for installing the preset is here: http://www.blurb.com/guides/pdf_to_book/indesign
You should not change anything in this preset. This has spreads turned OFF and bleeds turned ON.

Cheers,
Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Dec 2, 2009 10:24am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
blacks in background to match blacks in images
Book Design and Imaging

Hi Liz,
Great question. Here’s the answer straight from our PDF expert here.

Since preparing images to look “right” is a subjective art, creating a background Black to match these images also falls into the subjective category. We have developed the C-60 M-40 Y-40 K-100 Rich Black as a general guideline for a nice Rich Black. If you are interested in creating a Rich Black that matches your images, I would suggest opening an image in Photoshop that contains a Black that is pleasing and sample the color in Photoshop to get the CMYK components and create a swatch of that color in your Page-Layout Application. The only requirement with the Rich Black color is that it contain no more than 320% Total Ink Coverage (TIC). TIC is the total ink if you add up the Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black percentages. With this 320% TIC limit for the Printing Press it is not allowed to use the “Registration” swatch as it has a TIC of 400%.


Also, softproofing blacks on screen can be a challenge as it is really hard to present a representation of what happens to black when it hits the page on the screen. On the screen it just looks pale. To that end, I’d recommend getting it close and giving yourself the time and budget, if possible, to order a book and see if it meets your expectations. That’s really the bets way to see the results.
cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Nov 25, 2009 5:37pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Rich black?
PDF to Book

hey all. We’ve done testing of this on our end here at Blurb and also suggest 60/40/40/100 for best rich black results

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Oct 20, 2009 4:13pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
I was wandering...
PDF to Book

Hi Esfel,
Good question. PDF is the industry standard for high end printing and so we use that as well. This is true for both digital offset and traditional offset book printing.
Cheers, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Oct 16, 2009 4:59pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Colour space settings for InDesign layouts
Book Design and Imaging

Frank, you’ll be fine. The B3 profile is currently only available to a small number of Pros but eventually we’ll open this up to all those interested in soft-proofing and color management. either profile will provide good results as they are nearly similar.

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Oct 7, 2009 8:16am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
First PDF to Book attempt and happy as a pig in.....
PDF to Book

hi deanr1968 – thanks so much for your props and review of the process. Really happy to hear that the final book met your expectations. And yes, manual trimming of books is not always an exact science even though we lay down crop marks so it is best to extend images flush to the bleed line when possible.
cheers, chad (founding employee at Blurb)

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Sep 10, 2009 10:03am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
InDesign and Blurb: details about embedded images and color spaces
PDF to Book

jfriedl – did your book arrive in time?

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Sep 2, 2009 3:37pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Black & white images in color book?
Book Design and Imaging

Tony is correct. The best practices outlined here  (http://forums.blurb.com/forums/4/topics/7020) are for PDF to Book only. That said, let’s separate best practices in preparing B&W images for digital offset (Blurb books on the HP Indigo press) from color management.

1. Best practices when preparing B&W images for use in BookSmart
(for PDF to book look here)

The biggest challenge in printing B&W images in a 4-color process is the potential for the introduction of a color cast. A color cast is caused when the color space is converted down from the much larger RGB color spaces (sRGB, AdobeRGB, ProPhoto, etc) to CMYK. This is the case in any four-color process. There is also an accepted amoount of color drift within the digital offset presses. This is slight and must meet the acceptable delta as outlined by HP, but while most would never notice a slight shift in Cyan by three in a color image, it i smore noticeable in  black and white images.

Ok, so what to do? The best thing you can do is to be sure there is no underlying color cast in your images prior to importing to Blurb BookSmart. Here’s how:

  1. We recommend to open all of your images in Photoshop and run them through the ‘Black & White’ adjustment filter.
  2. You’ll find this option under the menu item ‘Image > Adjustments > Black & White’.
  3. This will pop-up a dialog with many ways to ‘tweak’ this. I usually just accept the default settings and press ‘OK’ , but there are Adobe tutorials to enjoy if you’d like more detail there.
  4. This will remove any color cast from your image that may exist even if it is not visible on screen.

What about just desaturating the images or converting to greyscale and then back to RGB. Both will work to remove the color cast, but may result in duller, muddier images. the B&W filter allows you more control over the conversion to B&W and attempts to take into account the perceptual differences in hue and saturation (more like B&W film) which desaturate or greyscale mode does not.

2. Color space for BookSmart
(for PDF to book look here)
BookSmart works in sRGB and will convert all RGB color spaces (Adobe RGB, ProPhoto) to sRGB on import. BookSmart does not accept CMYK images at this time. You have a choice then to convert all of your images to sRGB (using Convert to Profile) which gives you full control over render intent, or just let BookSmart do this conversion on import. See the video link below if you are interested in more on this.

This video webinar we created with X-rite is a great walkthrough of color management with Blurb:
http://www.xritephoto.com/default.aspx?MenuItemID=460&MenuGroup=Products&#Blurb

Hope this helps.
Cheers, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Aug 25, 2009 11:56am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
InDesign and Blurb: details about embedded images and color spaces
PDF to Book

you got it and phrased it much better than I. ;-) You can also use a Photoshop action to do all the conversions too.

You are correct in that how Blurb handles color space is slightly different for BookSmart and PDF to Book. BookSmart translates everything to sRGB when you import them into BookSmart. For PDF to Book we can handle any color space, but all RGB colorspaces (such as ProPhoto) are converted to sRGB when they hit the HP Indigo RIP. However, CMYK is honored and printed as whatever CMYK profile you specify. Which is much better outlined here:
http://blurb.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/451

So, long story, yes you are correct to convert your ProPhoto images to CMYK and this can be done in Photoshop or at time of export in InDesign as you describe.
Cheers, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Aug 20, 2009 5:20pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
InDesign and Blurb: details about embedded images and color spaces
PDF to Book

Hi. Good questions. You are correct, Blurb’s export settings file (jobptions for Adobe programs which is included with the InDesign templates) does not convert your images to a CMYK (or any other color space). We have done this to provide the book maker with the greatest control possible and recommend that you do any color space conversions using Photoshop prior to bringing your images into InDesign. Here are our detailed recommendations for PDF to Book:
http://blurb.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/451/

I would also suggest watching this video that explains the controls and variables Photoshop provides during the CMYK conversions (you’ll have to download it MOV):
http://www.xritephoto.com/default.aspx?MenuItemID=460&MenuGroup=Products&&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1#Blurb

We prefer that you use our Blurb PDF/X-3 export settings unchanged, but If you prefer can choose to do the CMYK conversion when you output the PDF from InDesign by changing that output conversion profile from “No Color Conversion” to “Convert to Destination” and select the “HP5000…” icc profile that you downloaded and installed from the FAQ I listed above. You’ll just have less control over that conversion.

Hope this helps.
Cheers, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Aug 20, 2009 9:35am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Colour space settings for InDesign layouts
Book Design and Imaging

Hi lizziefranc,
The most holistic document to keep on hand for PDF to Book is the Publishing Guide which covers much of the process including color management for PDF to Book. I imagine you have already referenced that, but if not, it can be downloaded either with the PDF templates or on its own here under the resources section: http://www.blurb.com/make/pdf_to_book

The section on color management for images is also duplicated as an FAQ here:
http://blurb.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/blurb.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=449

———-
That said, neither of these provide guidance for black and white images specifically. We will be updating this guide soon to reflect this, but let me offer a recommendation here. Please note, this recommendation is specific to PDF to Book workflow. The biggest challenge when printing black and white images in a four-color (CMYK) process is minimizing any unexpected color cast to print a rich, yet neutral, black and white image.

  1. First, Download the CMYK ICC profile for the HP Indigo presses we use provided here: http://blurb.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/blurb.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=449
  2. Install the ICC profile for Photoshop as described here:
    http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/profile_install.htm
  3. Next, we recommend to open all of your images in Photoshop and run them through the ‘Black & White’ adjustment filter.
    • You’ll find this option under the menu item ‘Image > Adjustments > Black & White’.
    • This will pop-up a dialog with many ways to ‘tweak’ this. I usually just accept the default settings and press ‘OK’ , but there are Adobe tutorials to enjoy if you’d like more detail there.
    • This will remove any color cast from your image that may exist even if it is not visible on screen.
  4. Then, if your images are in an RGB colorspace (AdobeRGB for example) convert them to CMYK. You do this in PhotoShop via menu item "Edit > Convert to Profile". Select the ‘HP5000’ profile as the target.  I could go into much more explanation about the differences in settings here, but as a rule of thumb I’d choose: Engine = Adobe (ACE); Intent = Perceptual;  Use Black Point Compensation; Do NOT Dither;  and Do flatten the image
  5. Save your image as a JPG at High Quality
  6. Add your images to Adobe InDesign and design your book
  7. When finished, use the PDF Export Settings (job options) file that is included with the InDesign Templates to export a PDF/X-3. Do not change any of the default settings.
  8. Upload and order your PDF to Book.

I know it would really help to have a video or screen shots explaining this a bit more clearly. I hope this helps for now.
Cheers,
Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Aug 18, 2009 4:48pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Final Size VS Trim Size - not using inDesign
PDF to Book

David – are these settings you refer to in Pages or Acrobat? Saving out via the Mac print dialog unfortunately won’t work as even the PDF (best Quality) is not high resolution prepress… it needs to specifically be PDF/X-3.

I’ve been researching alternatives to Adobe Acrobat Distiller, but am not having much luck. We’re working on a plug-in that will show up in the Apple Print dialog to make this easier.

Bets bet is to Print your file.. use the PDF pulldown use the “Save as Postscript” option. Then use Adobe Distiller and the Export Settings file included in our Indesign templates to create a PDF/X-3 from that postscript file.

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jul 24, 2009 4:16pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
How long to Preflight?
PDF to Book

Please contact customer support with your PDF Job ID number so they check and see specific to your books. PDF books are coming through successfully. Some books do take much longer to render and preflight than others, but we mostly see that with EPS graphic objects.
thx, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jul 16, 2009 11:29am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Premium paper for 5x8 Text Book ?
PDF to Book

Hi there –
This is an oversight (by me actually). These should not have been included in the template package for 5×8 book. There is no premium paper option with this book as you pointed out.
thanks, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jul 16, 2009 10:59am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
A better Preflight Check
PDF to Book

Thanks all. We are working on and rolling out improvements to the preflight process, one of which will be the ability to upload just the PDf (cover or pages) that threw an error. Stay tuned and thanks for all the great feedback. cheers, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jul 11, 2009 3:29pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Final Size VS Trim Size - not using inDesign
PDF to Book

Hi Dave –
This is a great question and illustrates where we can improve the messaging in the specification calculator. If you look back at the calculator you’ll see it that Bleed on pages is labeled as “(top, bottom, and outside edges)”. I can see the confusion here. This is in the context of a spread (two pages next to each other in a book – a left and a right page) where the “inside” edge of your page is the gutter and therefore should have any bleed.

A better way to phrase this then is for one a single page in Pages you have bleed only along 3 edges (top, bottom, and the single outside edge). This outside edge is on the left on an even page and the right on an odd numbered page. Remember the first page (page 1) in your book is on the right as you open your book and the last page is on the left as you close your book.

So Final size for Large Landscape pages should be: 12.625×10.875
Trim size should be: 12.5×10.625
Bleed on top: .125
Bleed on bottom: .125
Bleed on outside edge: .125
Bleed on inside edge: 0 (zero)

———————-
Here is where you find the location to set the top, bottom, inside and outside margins within Apple Pages:
1. Open your document
2. Open up the inspector palette
3. Click on the “Document” tab, which is the first one
4. Under “Document Margins” click the “Facing Pages” checkbox.

This will now allow you to set an inside and outside margin. Please note that you may want to include both the Bleed _and_ the safe area in your margin calculation. This gives you some white space between the edge of your content and where the page will be trimmed. For example, your total margin on the top, bottom and outside should then be .375 inches (.125 bleed + .25 safe area). Set the inside margin to .25 inches (.25 safe area, no bleed).

Hope this helps. We hope to get some video tutorials up soon to help with this.
Cheers,
Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jul 11, 2009 3:21pm PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Scribus template?
PDF to Book

Hi shukri -
Unfortunately I couldn’t fine any information on importing InDesign files into Scribus, but would surpise me if that isn’t a feature in prev or the latest stable release. You may want to download the CS2 format files from our templates page: http://www.blurb.com/make/pdf_to_book/template_indesign

These INX format or interchange format. It’s just an XML format so it should be fairly easy for some smart engineer to create an import tool for an Open Source product like Scribus. Brian is also correct that it is fairly simple using the Book Specification Calculator to create your book from scratch in Scribus.  We’ll be rolling out more templates over the next few months. I can’t guarantee Scribus, but it is certainly on our list.
Cheers, Chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jun 26, 2009 9:58am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Another size
PDF to Book

deanej is correct. Your PDF or source document needs to be resized exactly to our acceoted measurements as outlined here:
http://www.blurb.com/make/pdf_to_book/booksize_calculator

There is some wiggle room +/- 2 points built into the system for covers (and soon for pages), but PDfs that are the wrong size over that willnot pass preflight. Also worth noting that rounded sizes shown on the pricing page (such as 7×7) are different from the non-trimmed sizes you’ll need to provide as an upload. thx, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jun 26, 2009 9:45am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
Page Design Software Suggestions?
PDF to Book

Thanks Brian -
This step-by-step description using Word can also apply to using Pages. The biggest challenge will be in creating your cover (though I image Pages may be better at this than Word). Let us know how it goes for you. 

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/10/topics/6569

Thx, chad

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jun 26, 2009 9:41am PDT
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CapnScrappy
 
MS Word to PDF to Blurb
PDF to Book

Howdy –

This detailed explanation should be good partner to the Publishing Guide regarding Word (or Pages) until we can better integrate as a tutorial: 

http://forums.blurb.com/forums/10/topics/6569

Posted by
CapnScrappy
Jun 26, 2009 9:39am PDT
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CapnScrappy

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