lctalbot's Posts

question > *two-page-spread*
BookSmart

Ditto.  I’ve used Robin’s bethod on multiple two page spreads and it works great.

 Yours looks correct Ben.

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lctalbot
Dec 11, 2008 3:53pm PDT
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Compression question
Book Design and Imaging

I’be interested to find out what is going on for upload as well.  If you have over 1GB of phots, it is strange that the upload would be less than 500MB.  Even if they zipped up the entire contents of the book, it doesn’nt make sense.  Since JPEGs are already compressed, zipping (or compressing them in some other method) them will not result in any noticeable reduction in file size.  You can’t compress what is already compressed, at least, not very much.  If you take a collection of photos that equal 100MB in size, then add them to a zip file, the resulting zip file might be around 98MB or so, but not much less than 100..

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lctalbot
Dec 11, 2008 3:44pm PDT
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InDesign Templates
Book Design and Imaging

Try these…

 http://theartofengineering.wordpress.com/2008/01/22/free-blurb-templates/

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lctalbot
Nov 18, 2008 5:43pm PDT
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lctalbot
 
Table of Contents
BookSmart

Alternatively, use the text feature of your imaging editing program and simply create an image of your desired final ToC, then, load that image into Booksmart.  No formatting issues to deal with.

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lctalbot
Nov 17, 2008 6:10pm PDT
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Resize photo in Photoshop for Panorama
Book Design and Imaging

Yes, you need to resample your image.  In this case, upsample it.  The best way to do this in PS is to do it in smaller increments, i.e. 10% at a time, rather than going from 134ppi directly to 300.

As for the dimensions, you will likley need to crop your image in order to get the corret aspect ratio.  Your defayult image is in a 3:2 ratio.  If you increase the width to 26" without cropping, the resulting image will be over 17" tall.  This is clearly too tall for the pages of a 13×11 book, so you need to crop your image so that you get the correct aspect ratio for the desired output. 

What I would suggest is that you take your image and first, crop it to the correct ratio.  To do this in PS, use the cropping tool ans set it to the correct dimensions.  For your book this would be 25.254×10.877.  Once you have it cropped correctly, use the image resize to upsample it to whatever dimensions you need in order to equal 300 ppi.  With the previous crop, the image size tool should show those dimensions as the size and show the calculated PPI that results from the existing pixel dimensions.  Leaving the resample box checked, increase the PPI resolution amount in 10% increments up to 300.  Once you get there, you are done.

As for how to actually create a two page layout, that is another discussion.  See http://theartofengineering.wordpress.com/2008/01/12/putting-a-photo-across-the-gutter-of-a-spread/ for specific instructions on how to do this.  Plus, you can download templates to use in Photoshop for your own custome page design if you like.

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lctalbot
Nov 17, 2008 4:59pm PDT
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lctalbot
 
Panoramas (two page spread)
Tips and Tricks

Quite a lot of discussion on this topic.  I figured I’d share what i found on this when I needed to do a double page spread in my books.  First, these instructions are specific to Photoshop or InDesign.  Other editing applications should be similar in theory, but the practice may be different.

Specific insructions on how to do this can be found at http://theartofengineering.wordpress.com/2008/01/12/putting-a-photo-across-the-gutter-of-a-spread/.  I have used this method on numerous pages in both books I have created and the results have been fantastic.  It just doesn’t have to be as complicated as many here are making it out to be.  You may want to check out her other sections to learn how to download and use her templates, but they helped me tremendously with all my custom page layouts.

Hope this helps.

-Larry

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lctalbot
Sep 9, 2008 10:36am PDT
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Image quality question in new Booksmart versions.
BookSmart

Thanks Jeremy.  That is the news I was hoping for.  I was just a bit concerned since this behavior is different from my last experience.

Cheers,

Larry

Posted by
lctalbot
May 27, 2008 10:16am PDT
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Image quality question in new Booksmart versions.
BookSmart

I did my first Blurb book a few months ago, using I think, ver 1.9.2 or 1.9.3.  It came out well.  I am now starting my second book and upgraded to the current version of Booksmart 1.9.5. 

I noticed in the new book I am creating that the image quality is not like it was in my previous book.  When I zoom in on an image in Booksmart, either in edit or preview mode, the quality looks horrible.  It looks like a badly compressed heavily artifacted jpeg image.  The same goes for text.  I create all my pages in Photoshop them load them as full bleed pages in Booksmart.  The images themselves do not look like this when viewing them normally.  It is only after I load them in Booksmart.  I also noticed that when I view my first book, this does not occur. 

Finally, I uninstalled 1.9.5 and re-installed 1.9.4, but it is doing the same thing.  I do not have a copy of previous versions to try.

Did something change in Booksmart with regard to how images are loaded/imported that is causing this?  I don’t want to go through a bunch of effort, only to end up with a crummy book.

Help!

Posted by
lctalbot
May 26, 2008 11:55am PDT
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Page cropping
Book Printing

I just received my first Blurb book.  Overall, I’m very happy with it but  I noticed that the page cropping was not uniform from top to bottom.  What I mean is that it appears they cropped more off the bottom than they did the top.  This is consistent throughout the book. 

I created all my pages in Photoshop and loaded them as full bleed images within BookSmart.  In most of the pages, I left 1/4"+ space around all the edges to account for cropping.  In the book, the blank space at the top of the pages is considerably more than that on the bottom.  This is not necessarily a problem in that they did not crop off any image or text, however, in the interest of uniformity, I’d prefer the crops to be even.

So, my question is, is this just an individual printing issue or have those of you who have ordered multiple books seen similar behavior and is it consistent enough that I should plan for it when desiging page layouts in future books?

 Thanks

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lctalbot
Apr 9, 2008 1:00pm PDT
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My first book project - advice appreciated
Book Design and Imaging

No printing on the inside cover is available.  The closest you will get is the cover sleeve flap (front and rear) if you are creating a hardcover book.

Posted by
lctalbot
Apr 1, 2008 12:39pm PDT
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lctalbot
 
color proofing
Tips and Tricks

First, some basic info.  PPI/DPI ultimately means nothing unless you are printing.  While the two mean different things technically (Pixels per inch vs. Dots per inch), when discussing photo editing, it means pixels and is used to help define image resolution (pixel dimensions) and print size .  With this in mind, simply defining an image file at 300 DPI doesn’t provide any information about the image size or resolution.  To get either of these, you would need the other measurment along with the DPI setting.  For example, if you have an image file with pixel dimensions (resolution) of 1800×1200, then this will result in a 6" x 4" print {6(300) x 4(300)}with optimimum quality (300 DPI being defined as optimum quality).  However, if you take the same image and set any arbitrary DPI  number, with no other changes, you still have an image resolution of 1800×1200 and it will still print at 6×4 at optimum quality.  In reality, the DPI number is simply used to assist you in determining what the image resolution should be for a given print size, or what the optimum print size would be for an image with a given resolution.  It serves no other purpose than that.

 With this in mind, I’ll address the OP’s questions.

 #1  If you are using Blurb page layouts and simply dragging your images into the prepared layout boxes, then yes.  The dialog gives both container size info and pixel dimensions.  If you want the optimum print quality, your image file should match what is shown in the mouse over tip.

#2  If you follow #1 and work with Blurb that way, you need never be concerned with DPI at all.  The mouse over tip will tell you that for a container size (say 5×4) that the optimum pixel dimensions should be 1500×1200.  Doing the math shows that this results in an image that is 300 DPI.  5(300) x 4(300) = 1500×1200.  What you can do, depending upon what photo editor you use, is to set your crop tool to your desired image or container size and set it at 300 DPI.  Then, when you crop your image as desired, it will automatically result in the correct pixel dimensions without you having to check and set them manually.

#3  Looks like Luis answered this one OK.  I get the same experience as you, but am just submitting my first Blurb book, so I can’t say how it will ultimately turn out.  I suspect the difference in color cast will be negligable.

Hope this helps.

Posted by
lctalbot
Mar 29, 2008 11:05pm PDT
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